June 1, 2007, - 5:19 pm

Copper River Salmon Season

By Debbie Schlussel
If you are a salmon connoisseur and afficionado like me, then you know that we are right in the middle of Copper River Salmon season, which lasts only about 3-4 weeks. This year, it started around May 14th.
Copper River Salmon is the best tasting salmon there is. And it’s not from Norway or anywhere foreign. It’s from Alaska’s Copper River. The salmon must swim upstream 300 miles on the Copper River to spawn in Prince William Sound near the town of Cordova. To be tough enough to make it that far, they develop a special fat that helps them. That makes Copper River Salmon the tastiest that there is, if you cook it correctly and get the right cut, taken from the leanest part of the fish.

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Copper River Salmon

And it’s healthier than most salmon you see these days because it’s wild, not the unhealthy farm-raised variety that seems to dominate. It’s pricey, at $39.50 per pound, but well worth the taste for a once a year gourmet delicacy. Or you can order it at your local fish eatery.
The best Copper River Salmon is cooked with a lot of butter. But check out a recipe for Grilled Cooper River Salmon. And here’s one I have in my recipe collection for Maple Bourbon Copper River Salmon (never tried it and it sounds like it smothers the taste of the salmon with too many flavors, but ya never know . . .):
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Read the Wall Street Journal’s take and renowned Chef Tom Colicchio’s recipe for Copper River Salmon (this one uses the butter needed).
More info about Copper River Salmon, here and here.
Authentic Copper River Salmon has a seal like this . . .
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Oh, and uh, if you’re a member of PETA a/k/a PUTAh (People for the Unethical Treatment of Animals and humans), you’ll have to miss out. Sorry.

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6 Responses

I’m glad my palate is unsophisticated enough that I can enjoy cheap supermarket salmon and tuna from any old place.

LibertarianBulbasaur on June 2, 2007 at 1:06 am

    Try knowing something about something for other people, for once. I don’t drink wine, for instance. On metformin, it’s a bad idea, and as a rural physician on call to an inpatient psych unit 8 days out of 14, it’s even worse. However, for my friends who do drink wine, it’s important to know what type of wine they might like. So, Debbie, in addition to her brilliance in other areas, knows salmon. Good to know.

    tita2juju, I don’t keep kosher. But you should know that Kosher laws kept Jews from developing many parasitic diseases in the ancient times—for example, trichinosis. Making fun of something you’re ignorant about—especially with no historical background on that subject, is the work of a fool.

    Occam's Tool on September 10, 2010 at 6:46 pm

OK Schlussmeier: the next time you do a recipe do it mid week so I don’t obsess about it on my first free Saturday. Looks tasty. But don’t be such a snob. Washington Keta or Sockeye are nice too.
Are razor clams kosher?
NO, THE KOSHER RULE FOR FISH OR ANY WATER ORGANISM:
MUST HAVE HAD BOTH FINS AND SCALES WHEN IT WAS ALIVE (THEREFORE, NO SHELLFISH, SWORDFISH, OCTOPUS, SQUID, CALAMARI, EEL, ETC.–THANK G-D).
DEBBIE SCHLUSSEL

J-Lin on June 2, 2007 at 9:49 am

Clams along with all other types of shellfish are not kosher.

LibertarianBulbasaur on June 2, 2007 at 1:32 pm

I think the whole Kosher thing is silly. If its good, then eat it. By the way Deb, you really are a Hebrew hottie.

tita2juju on June 3, 2007 at 3:15 am

Debbie, I don’t eat anything that’s treif from the get go, and I don’t think I’ve ever been to a Red Lobster. I think we’re compatible.
FYI, READERS, THE WORD “TREIF” (CAN BE SPELLED IN OTHER WAYS, TOO) MEANS “NON-KOSHER” IN YIDDISH AND DERIVES FROM HEBREW.
DEBBIE SCHLUSSEL

Anonymous1 on June 3, 2007 at 11:33 am

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