September 1, 2006, - 11:58 am

“Missing” Egyptian Students: The Story Isn’t Over

By Debbie Schlussel
Remember the 11 “missing” Egyptian students, who never showed up at Montana State University after their planes reached New York? They eventually found all of them (2 at a mysterious terror-linked pizza shop). But the story isn’t over.
Yesterday, three of the students had a secret bond hearing in Omaha, Nebraska, which lasted more than FIVE HOURS(!), according to Omaha’s KETV. Surprise! surprise!–the hearing was CLOSED.
None of the media reports name the students (WHY?). But they are: Ahmed Refaat Saad El Moghazi El Laket, 19, Mohamed Ibrahim El Sayed El Moghazy, 20, and Moustafa Wagdy Moustafa El Gafary, 18.

egyptianstudentellaket.jpgegyptianstudentselmoghazy.jpgegyptianstudentselgafary.jpg

“Non-Terrorist” Egyptian Students El Laket, El Moghazy & El Gafary

Had Secret 5-Hour Hearing

Five hours is very long for a bond hearing. They usually last minutes, at most. So, why did this hearing last for five hours? What was going on? And why did their attorney ask the judge that the hearing be closed to the press? (We mean the real reason, not the BS reason given by the attorney.) And why was bond set at $10,000 a piece? That’s a high bond for your average missing illegal alien who is finally found.
It was disclosed that the three used aliases to get bus tickets. And who knows what else? Little else has been made public about the mysterious 5-hour-plus hearing. And little else has been told to us about why the FBI–the lead agency for terrorism investigations, NOT immigration/alien ones–was the lead agency on this case.
Do you buy the judge’s and attorney’s claims that the case has “nothing to do with terrorism”? We don’t either. Whenever we’re told that, it usually means–on the contrary–that is has everything to do with it.
Thanks to reader Renee from Nebraska who rightly complains that the story is getting very little play even in her home state, where it took place. “The big news here is Husker football,” she writes.
If we don’t concern ourselves more with these matters, there won’t be football in future generations. Even if footballs are no longer made of real pigskin.

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11 Responses

“Why did their attorney ask the judge that the hearing be closed to the press?”
It’s clearly stated in the article:
“I was going by my clients wishes,” Peck said. “You got to understand their culture. They come from Egypt, where if you say something wrong and it gets published, even if you say what you feel and it gets published, you’re punished.”
“Do you buy the judge’s and attorney’s claims that the case has “nothing to do with terrorism”?”
Yes. Once again, you offer nothing but hysterical speculation to prove otherwise.
DUH! I READ THAT. IF YOU BELIEVE THAT BS, THEN YOU ARE EVEN MORE GULLIBLE THAN I HAD EARLIER DIAGNOSED.
DEBBIE SCHLUSSEL

Avalon on September 1, 2006 at 12:34 pm

Avalon: But ultimately it’s the judge’s decision on whether it should be closed. Frankly I think most court cases should be completely open to the public.

Manatoch on September 1, 2006 at 1:20 pm

“Do you buy the judge’s and attorney’s claims that the case has “nothing to do with terrorism”? We don’t either. Whenever we’re told that, it usually means–on the contrary–that is has everything to do with it.”
Of course it has to do with ties to terrorism. The FBI must’ve picked up on something, and asked them to be held so they don’t disappear into the fog or flee the country. A key thing to watch here is if they DO post bond, then who posted it for them. I doubt they’d have the resources to do it themselves.
Anyone who can’t connect the dots in this case is either a:
1. a complete imbecile,
2. a sympathetic “moderate Muzlum”,
3. a LIBERAL who hates America but loves its enemies.
To prove the point that the FBI’s onto something is to say that the immigration hearings for the other Egyptians weren’t handled this way. I don’t know for sure but I’d like to find out. But, as Debbie pointed out, it’s usually immigration who usually pursues these cases – not the FBI.

Thee_Bruno on September 1, 2006 at 1:31 pm

Our attitude towards terrorism has an affected and surreal quality. We can’t even call it “Islamofascism.” It has a dream-like nature to it the surrealists never envisaged. You can be sure that when the authorities and the media swear they aren’t terrorists and whatever happened had nothing to do with terrorism, you have to assume both of those things contrary to the avowed denials, are in fact, true. Our inability, as the fifth year anniversary of 9/11 draws nearer, to openly identify and fight the enemy bent upon killing all of us, makes it difficult to sustain the kind of commitment (which may take generations) needed to win this war. And a good portion of Americans want to be AWOL from this and get back to their own lives – with pigskin football and all. What a difference five years makes.

NormanF on September 1, 2006 at 1:54 pm

“If we don’t concern ourselves more with these matters, there won’t be football in future generations. Even if footballs are no longer made of real pigskin.”
I wholeheartedly agree!~~~~~~~

Freudianslippers on September 1, 2006 at 4:11 pm

Ten thousand seems a little low. If their mentors are as rich as one would suspect, that is a palty sum to obtain the release of a terrorist cell member.

Craig C on September 1, 2006 at 5:25 pm

Hopefully, if and when bailed out, they have GPS systems firmly inserted deeeeeeep. And none will fart without the FBI smelling it.
I think I know why their names aren’t published in papers, it would severely cut down on their advertising space.
(Avolon bitch-slapped again).

Grateful1 on September 2, 2006 at 7:36 am

Bruno…There aint NO moderate muslims. Any muslim daring to be moderate is KILLED…period. If you want to stay alive, you get with the program…JIHAD!!
And that’s the reason islam should be outlawed in the civilized world.

joesixpack31 on September 3, 2006 at 10:49 am

What really puzzles me about this case is, in fact, the bond hearing lasting 5 hrs. The longest bond hearing that I have ever seen lasted about 45 minutes and that was for a capital murder case!
The only thing I can come up with is; did they request translators?

Phoenix on September 3, 2006 at 12:02 pm

I say : I am an egyptian Moslem engineer …
I agree with most of the stuff said on this blog and read it
But hey folks try to keep it in check within credibility … meaning those kids were probably looking for a way out of economic derivation at home .
Maybe naiively … but I doubt that they are clandistine… I am not informed enough though … but blowing things out of proportion does not serve anyone in the long run
stay well all
Mohamed Fawzi

Mohamed_Fawzi on September 5, 2006 at 7:24 am

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