January 12, 2007, - 4:12 pm

La-Z Boys & Harry Potter: “The Gitmo High Life”

By Debbie Schlussel
Since this week marks the fifth anniversary of Islamic terrorists being held at Guantanamo Bay, I highly recommend “The Gitmo High Life,” by Robert L. Pollock in today’s Wall Street Journal about the treatment the detainees there get.
While guards are in uncomfortable straight-back chairs, these terrorists are treated to La-Z Boys, Harry Potter and the best medical care money can boy from the U.S. mainland.
Some excerpts:

in the interrogation room it’s the Americans who may have to suffer long hours in straight-back chairs, while the detainees — I kid you not — get a La-Z-Boy. I was shown a Syrian under interrogation via closed circuit television. His questioners were two pleasant-looking young women. He was smiling. . . .

lazboy.jpgharrypotterposter.jpg

The Perks of Gitmo: Two Examples of “Torture” @ Guantanamo Bay

Detainees in Defense Department custody are treated according to the restrictive rules of the Army Field Manual, which bans all forms of coercive interrogation. . . . Not only does that mean no “torture” is going on. Your average good-cop bad-cop routine isn’t allowed. Cooperative detainees get rewards like movies. “Harry Potter” is one of their favorites. . . .
Maybe terrorism is stressful work. But whatever the reason, [Saifullah] Paracha . . . suffers from heart disease. So late last year — at an expense of some $400,000 — the U.S. government flew down doctors and equipment to perform cardiac catheterization. Mr. Paracha’s response was to refuse treatment and file a petition in U.S. federal court. . . .
The medical care at Guantanamo seems state of the art. All detainees over 50 are offered colonoscopies; at least 16 have been performed. . . .
Guantanamo detainees don’t lack for legal representation. A list of lead counsel released this week in response to a Freedom of Information Act request reads like a who’s who of America’s most prestigious law firms: Shearman and Sterling; Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale & Dorr; Covington & Burling; Hunton & Williams; Sullivan & Cromwell; Debevoise & Plimpton; Cleary Gottlieb; and Blank Rome are among the marquee names.
A senior U.S. official I spoke to speculates that this information might cause something of scandal, since so much of the pro bono work being done to tilt the playing field in favor of al Qaeda appears to be subsidized by legal fees from the Fortune 500. “Corporate CEOs seeing this should ask firms to choose between lucrative retainers and representing terrorists” who deliberately target the U.S. economy, he opined. [DS: Great point!] . . .
The picture of Guantanamo usually painted by the press and human-rights activists is a terribly distorted one. Americans should rest assured that the men held there are probably getting better treatment than they deserve.

AMEN.

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4 Responses

Yeah, i REMEMBER seeing the same thing on “Hogan’s Heros”…..

EminemsRevenge on January 12, 2007 at 5:22 pm

The IslamiNazis give our prisoners the Daniel Pearl Treatment. It’s going to take worse events than 9/11 to change our tactics towards the enemy. We need General Patton. Instead, we have Mr. Rogers running the “war on terror.”

FreethinkerNY on January 12, 2007 at 5:38 pm

http://law.shu.edu/news/guantanamo_report_final_2_08_06.pdf
1. Fifty-five percent (55%) of the detainees are not determined to have committed any hostile acts against the United States or its coalition allies.
2. Only 8% of the detainees were characterized as al Qaeda fighters. Of the remaining detainees, 40% have no definitive connection with al Qaeda at all and 18% are have no definitive affiliation with either al Qaeda or the Taliban.
3. The Government has detained numerous persons based on mere affiliations with a large number of groups that in fact, are not on the Department of Homeland Security terrorist watchlist. Moreover, the nexus between such a detainee and such organizations varies considerably. Eight percent are detained because they are deemed “fighters for;” 30% considered “members of;” a large majority – 60% — are detained merely because they are “associated with” a group or groups the Government asserts are terrorist organizations. For 2% of the prisoners their nexus to any terrorist group is unidentified.
4. Only 5% of the detainees were captured by United States forces. 86% of the detainees were arrested by either Pakistan or the Northern Alliance and turned over to United States custody. This 86% of the detainees captured by Pakistan or the Northern Alliance were handed over to the United States at a time in which the United States offered large bounties for capture of suspected enemies.
5. Finally, the population of persons deemed not to be enemy combatants – mostly Uighers – are in fact accused of more serious allegations than a great many persons still deemed to be enemy combatants.
_________________________________________________
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2006-12-15-gitmo-freed_x.htm
Once, the detainees arrived in other countries, 205 of the 245 were either freed without being charged or were cleared of charges related to their detention at Guantanamo. Forty either stand charged with crimes or continue to be detained.
________________________________________________
Good job defending the detention of innocent people.
APPARENTLY, I SHOULDN’T HAVE LEFT OUT THE PARTS OF THIS WALL STREET JOURNAL ARTICLE THAT I DID. BUT I’LL REPRINT ONE PART I OMITTED HERE, AS I’M SURE THIS MAN IS AS INNOCENT AS YOU CLAIM (NOT):
When it comes to medical care, almost no expense is spared — as I discovered after spotting an overweight man lounging in the rec yard of Camp Five. “Khalid Sheikh Mohammed?” I inquired (he was some distance away). “No, that’s Paracha,” came the somewhat exasperated reply.
Saifullah Paracha is a Pakistani businessman and media owner who claims two meetings with Osama bin Laden were purely for journalistic interest. He is believed to be an important figure in the case against Majid Khan, one of the 14 “high value” detainees recently transferred to Gitmo from CIA custody. Last year Mr. Paracha’s son Uzair was sentenced to 30 years in a U.S. prison for aiding an al Qaeda operative in a plot to bomb U.S. targets.
Maybe terrorism is stressful work. But whatever the reason, the elder Paracha also suffers from heart disease. . . .
DEBBIE SCHLUSSEL

AJB on January 12, 2007 at 8:59 pm

Our Political leaders including the perfumed princes that masquerade as military men have a disease called PC.
I cannot believe these people that run Gitmo really think they are running a prison. They are running a 5 star hotel for terrorists.
The Late Colonel David Hackworth warned us what was happening in the Pentagon. Unfortunately, he is no longer around to expose the phonys that call themselves warriors and the infection spreading from within called Political Correctness.
http://www.hackworth.com/
This in not only nuts is should be a criminal offense.
Time to clean the swamp in the US Government, they all have gone off the deep end.

ScottyDog on January 15, 2007 at 11:06 am

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