February 12, 2007, - 11:01 am

Who is Funding “The Kingdom”?: Hollywood Puts Out a Soft-on-Saudis Terrorism Flick

By Debbie Schlussel
On September 28, 2007, barely two weeks after the sixth anniversary of 9/11–in which more than 75% of the perpetrators were Saudis, Universal Pictures will release, “The Kingdom.” (Film website, with trailer, here.)
Starring Jamie Foxx, Jennifer Garner, and Jason Bateman (who should have done us a favor and retired after his “Silver Spoons” gig with Ricky Schroeder) as FBI counterterrorism agents, the movie is about an FBI team’s travails in Saudi Arabia, investigating a terrorist attack on Americans and trying to hunt down the terrorist mastermind behind it before he commits further attacks.

saudiflag911.jpg

Saudi 9/11 Flag by David Lunde/Lundesigns

While the movie sends initially anti-Saudi, it ends up that a kindly Saudi police captain is the one who helps the Americans and saves the day. Like that has EVER happened or WOULD EVER happen. When, in real life, in May 2003, housing compounds holding mostly Americans in Saudi Arabia were blown up by suicide car bombs, the Saudis were completely uncooperative in our investigations.
Sorry, but in real life the Saudis usually are working hand-in-hand with the terrorists. Then, we hear the usual reports that the Saudis killed the terrorists in hot pursuit (which either never really happened or happened because the Saudis don’t want the terrorists to tell us how the Saudis funded and aided them).
The press materials sent out by the studio say:

But when a sympathetic Saudi police captain helps them navigate Riyadh politics and investigate the true cause of the attack, Fleury finds an unexpected comrade-in-arms. In their lightning fast attempt to crack the case, the partners’ search leads them straight to the killers’ front door. Now in a fight for their own lives, two teams on opposite sides of the war on terror won’t stop until justice is found in THE KINGDOM.

The question that should be asked here is obvious: Who is funding this movie? How much Saudi or Muslim money is going into this propaganda film? Would love to know, but the credits don’t tell you that kind of info. What they do show is that two Saudis, Yamen Al-Hajjar and Ahmed Al-Ibrahim (who also co-stars in the movie), are listed as consultants on Arabic, Islam, and Saudi Arabia. Al-Hajjar is a Saudi National who is a student at Boston University and says he will return to the Kingdon of Saudi Arabia after graduation to work for Saudi Aramco oil company. I’m sure they’re not biased at all in favor of their native land and “peaceful” religion.
As I noted last year, Producer/Writer Michael Mann’s last major motion picture, “Miami Vice” featured a drug dealer wearing an Israeli Army T-shirt. Sounds like his mind is pan-Islamist occupied territory.
Here’s the full synopsis of the movie, as provided by Universal:

Director Peter Berg, who blisteringly reinterpreted the high-school sports drama with the celebrated Friday Night Lights, producer Michael Mann (Heat, The Insider, The Aviator, Miami Vice), and producer Scott Stuber (You, Me and Dupree, The Break-Up) join Oscar winner Jamie Foxx in a timely thriller about the explosive clash that happens when Middle East meets West: THE KINGDOM.
Foxx stars as whip-smart FBI Special Agent Ronald Fleury, who has just received the assignment of his career: assemble an elite team (played by Jennifer Garner, Oscar winner Chris Cooper and Jason Bateman) and go to Riyadh to hunt down and capture the terrorist mastermind behind a deadly attack on Americans working in Saudi Arabia. The feds have only one week to infiltrate and cripple a cell bent on jihad to western society.
No training could prepare Fleury and his team for the disorienting culture shock they face once inside this scorching foreign land–a byzantine maze in which they find profiteering politicians funding violent insurgents. Bound by handlers who refuse to play ball with the U.S., the agents quickly find the local law enforcement more hindrance than help and soon grow uncertain of anybody’s allegiance.
But when a sympathetic Saudi police captain helps them navigate Riyadh politics and investigate the true cause of the attack, Fleury finds an unexpected comrade-in-arms. In their lightning fast attempt to crack the case, the partners’ search leads them straight to the killers’ front door. Now in a fight for their own lives, two teams on opposite sides of the war on terror won’t stop until justice is found in THE KINGDOM.

Riiiight.
And by the way, in real life, the FBI agents we sent to Saudi Arabia weren’t exactly prize material either. One of them, Gamal Abdel-Hafiz was the subject of multiple complaints for refusing to wiretap and investigate Muslim terrorists, including Sami Al-Arian, and was fired, then rehired, after lying to the FBI regarding an insurance scam in which his ex-wife said he was involved.
He and his FBI boss in Riyadh, Wilfred Rattigan–who converted to Islam, and went on the Hajj, leaving the FBI offices in Riyadh abandoned, admitted to leaving a backlog of important terrorism and 9/11-related documents that had not been translated, copied, or scanned. Some of the documents were also apparently shredded before ever being reviewed, according to some reports.

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17 Responses

As G. Gordon Liddy (see, Pawn Hannity, it’s not hard) always says, “The Saudis are not our friends or allies.”
Be a man, Pawn Hannity.

Jeff_W on February 12, 2007 at 12:39 pm

Why do you keep picking on the creative community? They are human beings just trying to grind out a few hundred million in profits exactly like other Americans. Have you considered what might happen if Europeans stopped going to American movies? As it is Hollywood has to recut all movies going into Muslim countries in order to conform to Sharia Law. Isn’t that enough?

Duke on February 12, 2007 at 12:41 pm

Pretty Boy Sean is a star-f’er. He just wants to be loved. He’s like a puppy dog (sorry, puppy dogs). He’s no G. Gordon. If only he were more intelligent. Then there would be hope. He needs to be in therapy.

lexi on February 12, 2007 at 1:16 pm

I can’t wait until some rich conservative Christians and Jews get together to make the most anti-Muslim movie ever! The Muslims could be portrayed as blood thirsty savages, sort of like how Mel Gibson portrayed the Jews in “The Passion…”. Why not, right? I mean the Turks did it to Americans with “Valley of the Wolves Iraq” starring American actors Billy Zane and Born-again Christian, Gary Busey who acts as a Jewish doctor harvesting the organs of Iraqis and selling them to rich Jews in America and Israel.
[…in May 2003, housing compounds holding mostly Americans in Saudi Arabia were blown up by suicide car bombs, the Saudis were completely uncooperative in our investigations.]
I’ll have to get a hold of Ambassador Adel Al-Jubeir to see what he thinks about this.
Oh, btw, Jimmy Carter won a Spoken Word Grammy for his audio book,“Our Endangered Values: America’s Moral Crisis.” Gee, I wonder if he’ll be nominated next year for the audio version of “Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid”???

Norman Blitzer on February 12, 2007 at 4:21 pm

I’d like to give Jimmy Carter the first annual “Dhimmi Award” for being the President who has done the most to aid and encourage Radical Islam.

FreethinkerNY on February 12, 2007 at 4:47 pm

Unfortunately THIS: http://www.xanga.com/NYCJOYCE/568418067/babeland-the-amerkkklan-dream.html
is only available to Xanga members since i’ve been Lenny Bruced…i.e., censured and considered obscene…but AFTER seeing “Babel” after YOU dismissed it Debski—i KNOW you will NEVER be a movie reviewer SHiiTe

EminemsRevenge on February 12, 2007 at 5:40 pm

Here’s the whole sordid affair on Front Page:
http://www.frontpagemag.com/Articles/ReadArticle.asp?ID=20487
Usual suspects: al-Arian, Alamoudi, Norquist.
BTW: why is Norquist just walking around after having committed semi-treasonous acts? If you’re well-connected in DC, that dosen’t matter. His name comes up time and again.

sonomaca on February 12, 2007 at 7:29 pm

I think Jimmy Carter should be deported to his model country, Cuba.
I would love to hear him sing the praises after being forced to live there after a year or two.

ScottyDog on February 12, 2007 at 8:04 pm

I find it disturbing and discouraging that Wilfred Rattigan ‘reverted’. He should have been recalled immediately. Can’t fire him because of PC. How are our political leaders ever going to understand Islam when Islam is placing all these ‘mental blocks’ in strategic positions throughout the Western institutes and within the infidel governments themselves? Look at Europe, the Arabs have bought that continent. Everybody of position has a tag and business is brisk.

John Sobieski on February 12, 2007 at 9:33 pm

Norman Blitzer, “I can’t wait until some rich conservative Christians and Jews get together to make the most anti-Muslim movie ever!”
Just what’s your point, Norman? Just when did a bunch of Christians fly airplanes into buildings in the name of Jesus?
I can’t speak for all Christians but as long as Muslims don’t try to attack me or my country they can worship Allah all they like. I really don’t think Christians as a whole care about creating any anti Muslim or anti Jew movie. No matter what Gibson’s views are of Jews (and I’m not defending him on that issue), most Christians I know didn’t love The Passion because it was anti Jewish. They loved it because of the portrayal of the sacrifice Jesus made for us.
If anyone is spewing hatred it’s you. If you are anywhere near the theology expert you claim you know there are vast differences between Muslims vs. Jews and Christians.

The_Man on February 12, 2007 at 9:48 pm

The_Man posted:
[If anyone is spewing hatred it’s you]
You don’t know what you’re talking about. I’ve never spewed hatred against any group. Here however, hatred is spewed not only against Muslims but also Democrats, liberals and atheists.
[If you are anywhere near the theology expert you claim you know there are vast differences between Muslims vs. Jews and Christians.]
You’ve entirely missed the point yet again. If you look at my comments on this subject, I point out those differences. But what you’re unwilling to accept is that Jews, Christians and Muslims profess in believing the same God. Instead of claiming the ridiculous idea that Allah is really the Arabian Moon God, just say Muhammad made up the Koran based on the Bible. End of story. But then again, some think the New Testament was made up, and others feel the Torah was made up from stories and laws from Babylon like the Epic of Gilgamesh and Hammurabi’s code.
Next time stay on topic and post something entertaining that Debbie would enjoy. I’m sure Debbie is getting sick of this God vs. Allah debate, and so am I.
SPEAK FOR YOURSELF.
DEBBIE SCHLUSSEL

Norman Blitzer on February 12, 2007 at 10:22 pm

“But what you’re unwilling to accept is that Jews, Christians and Muslims profess in believing the same God.”
NormB,
Same refrain I see, moi aussi.
It is illogical for a true Christian to ‘profess’ that allah and God are one and the same.
1) The core tenet of Christianity is that Jesus is divine as stated in the Gospels, the Second Person of the Trinity.
2) In the qur’an, allah denies Jesus’s divinity.
From a Christian perspective, the only two ways to resolve this contradiction are 1) allah is a false god or 2) the qur’an is a fabrication and Mo is a liar. But, if the qur’an is a fabrication, then allah is also a fabrication.
For NON-Christians, the contradiction can also be resolved by believing the Gospels to be a fabrication. This appears to be your position. It is also the muslim position.
My conclusion is that you are undertaking a Sisyphean task if you are attempting to convince Christians that allah is the same god as God. Also, since your position appears identical to the muslim position on this issue, it is not unfair for you to be labeled a muslim apologist.

WillPower on February 12, 2007 at 11:22 pm

WillPower,
Christians don’t have to believe Islam is right in order to tolerate the idea that Muslims believe in the same God as them. Pope John Paul II met with a group of Imans and bowed to the Koran and kissed it. I don’t need to tell you that the Pope is the leader of the largest and oldest Christian denomination, Roman Catholicism, and is considered by Catholics to be the Vicar of Christ.
http://www.traditioninaction.org/RevolutionPhotos/A055rcKoran.htm
And I’m not a Muslim apologist since I’ve never defended the authenticity of the Koran nor defended terrorist acts by Muslims. I’ve only pointed out that the same charges leveled at the Koran can be leveled at the Bible.

Norman Blitzer on February 13, 2007 at 9:54 am

WillPower–
Nice job connecting the dots.
Of course, Allah does not equal God of the Christians, because of the Trinity.
Jews can take a pass in the sense that Trinitarian nature was not revealed in Old Testament. I suppose Jews can be “agnostic” about the Trinity, although Muslims absolutely deny it.
Certain passages in the Talmud are very negative on Jesus, but presumably these are not essential to core beliefs of Judaism.

Red Ryder on February 13, 2007 at 9:56 am

Norman–
You are right that John Paul II kissed the Koran. However, you should know that he was roundly condemned for this act by MANY Catholics, and, frankly, would have been excommunicated for doing such a thing, perhaps 50 years earlier.
Even the vicar of Christ can make mistakes. Infallibility only applies on issues of faith and morals, when Pope is speaking Ex Cathedra.

Red Ryder on February 13, 2007 at 10:00 am

Norman–
One more thing, please…
You stated that–
“Christians don’t have to believe Islam is right in order to tolerate the idea that Muslims believe in the same God as them.”
My head exploded on that one.
If two parties cannot even agree on the fundamentals of what God is, how can they “tolerate” the idea that Muslims believe in the same God as them?
At best, they can tolerate Muslims, knowing that their beliefs absolutely conflict.
Too bad Muslims don’t feel the same way.

Red Ryder on February 13, 2007 at 10:20 am

- the trinity is not necessarily a “core tenet” for all christians… rather, it is an oft-contested conception of god, first documented three centuries after the death of jesus in the nicene creed. further, there are many differing conceptions of the trinity itself… for some, jesus is merely one of three manifestations of the triune god.
– regardless, since the various conceptions of god are differentiated qualitatively, at what point do ‘differing conceptions of god’ become ‘conceptions of different gods’? consider this pair of apagogical arguments (reductio ad absurda):
[1] if there can only be one conception of god, then no two theists worship the same god.
[2] if there can be multiple conceptions of god, then all monotheists worship the same god.
obviously, the arrangement of worshippers into groups becomes arbitrary… yet it makes sense to speak of jews, christians, muslims, etc. so if we can’t rely on qualitative differences, what should we use? linguistically, historically, and theologically, it seems clear that mohammed based his faith directly on the existing judeo-christian religions and asserted that he had received the final revelation from the “god of abraham “. this really doesn’t seem that different from a conception of jesus as the fulfillment of old testament scripture.
in other words, if you’re going to accept jews and christians as praying to the same god, then you have to accept muslims as also praying to the same god. you’re more than entitled to raise qualitative differences, but then you’re on a slippery slope and have to turn your back on a lot of linguistic, historical, and theological knowledge. regardless, this little debate is currently unresolvable mostly because each side is employing different criteria, terminology, and logic structures.
– oh, and ‘red ryder’… please try to avoid statements like “too bad Muslims don’t feel the same way”, etc.

demagogueshatelogic on February 16, 2007 at 1:08 pm

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