May 26, 2008, - 1:26 pm

Memorial Day Movie Choices Honoring Our Best

By Debbie Schlussel
With Hollywood’s spate of anti-American war movies over the last several years (all of them bombs), my friend Mike Church (on whose Sirius Patriot Channel 144 show I do movie reviews and talk politics, every Friday) has a great list of great movies for Memorial Day. These movies–selections of the KingDude Memorial Day Movie Guide–honor our troops and celebrate their greatness, heroism, courage under fire, and sacrifices throughout American history. I agree with all of Mike’s choices (though I haven’t yet seen “The Crossing”) and add two others:
* The Great Raid (click to read my review)
* Saving Private Ryan
What movies would you add to Mike’s and my lists?

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10 Responses

I’d suggest Gettysburg, and Gods and Generals…both very well done, and two of the best Civil War movies ever made (far better than the PC pick, Glory).

Sharps Rifle on May 26, 2008 at 4:09 pm

Oh, just something that Mike should know…”Stalag 17″ was NOT the basis for “Hogan’s Heroes.” “Hogan’s Heroes” was actually taken from an idea that Albert Fine and Bernard Ruddy had for a series set in an American prison, where convicts would have their tunnels out of the prison, and the prisoners (having seen the error of their criminal ways) would go out each night and do good deeds, getting back to jail before morning head count. CBS (obviously) rejected that premise.
Instead, after reading the novel “Von Ryan’s Express,” Fine and Ruddy re-tooled their pitch to be about POW’s who carried out sabotage deep inside Germany, aiding escaping POW’s and downed flyers, all the while avoiding detection by the Gestapo. Still far fetched, but that was what became “Hogan’s Heroes.”
The only similarity between “Stalag 17” and “Hogan’s Heroes” was that both had a Sergeant Schultz…Johann Sebastian Schultz in “Stalag 17,” and Hans Schultz in “Hogan’s Heroes.” Other than that, there were no similarities. I suspect because both had a Schultz and were set in German POW camps, people think one derived from the other, but that’s not how it was. I like both, but “Stalag 17” is a very black comedy, whereas “Hogan’s Heroes” is often a bit more of a situation comedy…still funny, but without the bite of “17”.

Sharps Rifle on May 26, 2008 at 4:20 pm

Greetings:
The movies that come closest to portraying my own personal experiences as a soldier in Viet Nam are:
CASUALTIES OF WAR, starring Michael J. Fox and Sean Penn
GARDENS OF STONE, starring James Caan and James Earl Jones
FORREST GUMP, starring Tom Hanks and Gary Sinese.
Last night, I watched the Memorial Day Concert on television, and today, some of our residents here at the Armed Forces Retirement Home went downtown to ride in the parade.
I have strong feelings about this, which I consider a travesty.
Memorial Day is to be observed, not celebrated.
Memorial Day is for the dead, and is an inappropriate occasion for concerts and parades.
Veteran’s Day is for honoring the living veterans, and that is the proper time to enjoy concerts and hold parades.
Also, I still feel strongly that Memorial Day should be on the Thirtieth of May, not on some capriciously random federal Monday holiday weekend.
Further, as a direct descendent of Confederate soldiers, I don’t want it forgotten that Memorial Day first began as Decoration Day, and it began in the Deep South, with ladies placing flowers on the graves of unknown Confederate dead.
That custom was observed by a Union general from Illinois, and he plagiarized it.
He’s buried here in the National Cemetery across the street (where I’ll probably lie one day).
By the way, Miss Schlussel, it’s been many years since I’ve been to Israel.
What is the custom there, regarding remembering fallen military heroes, and honoring living military veterans?
I know they have a big parade every year, for I’ve seen it on the news, and I have souvenir picture postcards of Zahal.
Thank you.
John Robert Mallernee
Bard of Clan Henderson
Armed Forces Retirement Home
Washington, D.C. 20011-8400

writesong on May 26, 2008 at 4:52 pm

I would suggest a few John Wayne movies such as “In Harms Way or They Were Expendable”, George C. Scott in “Patton”, Greggory Peck in “MacArthur”, Mel Gibson’s “The Patriot”, Jimmy Stewart in “Stratigic Air Command” or Henry Fonda in such classics as “Midway”, or for a little comic relief in “Mister Roberts”.

paperlion on May 26, 2008 at 5:01 pm

I would suggest a few John Wayne movies such as “In Harms Way or They Were Expendable”, George C. Scott in “Patton”, Greggory Peck in “MacArthur”, Mel Gibson’s “The Patriot”, Jimmy Stewart in “Stratigic Air Command” or Henry Fonda in such classics as “Midway”, or for a little comic relief in “Mister Roberts”.

paperlion on May 26, 2008 at 5:02 pm

I watch Patton on occasion and also like Full Metal Jacket. I saw Patton a long time ago and was impressed. He impressed me even more after reading a few books about him. I truly believe that the veterans of the Iraq war will produce another great generation of leaders. We will look at the 60’s and 70’s Ted Kennedy leaders like the libtards that they are. Being old doesn’t automatically entitle you to being revered. Veterans are the heart and soul of this country.

samurai on May 26, 2008 at 8:51 pm

Tonight I’m watching the Howard Hughes’ movie “Hell’s Angels” about WWI fighter pilots (I hope it’s good). Followed by Battle for Britian, then The Great Escape, Midway, and ending with Go For Broke.

bhparkman on May 27, 2008 at 12:29 am

I was never a war movie guy, but I liked “Heartbreak Ridge” with Clint Eastwood.
Even though you mentioned it, based on your review, Debbie, I saw “The Great Raid” and it’s one of the best movies I’ve ever seen. I have it on DVD and have to admit I get tears in my eyes every time I see it.
It’s been ages since I’ve seen it, but “The Dirty Dozen” was another movie I liked a lot from what I recall.

Jeff_W on May 27, 2008 at 10:24 am

Don’t forget about “The Bridge Over The River Kwai”
No computer graphics there…real bridge, real train !!
“Madness…..Madness”

Shootist on May 27, 2008 at 10:32 am

Shootist, Et Alii:
Your mentioning of THE BRIDGE OVER THE RIVER KWAI reminded me of yet another great war movie.
TO END ALL WARS is about Scottish prisoners of war forced to work on the Burma railroad.
I don’t know why I’ve seen that movie only once on television.
It’s so good, I wonder why it isn’t more popular?
See if you can find the DVD, so you can watch it.
One of the best war movies of all time has to be EMPIRE OF THE SUN, which describes the adventures of a small English boy in Shang Hai during the Second World War.
Another really good movie is BABY BLUE MARINE, starring Jan-Michael Vincent.
It tells of a Marine in the Second World War who washes out of Boot Camp and is sent home in disgrace.
I like it because of my own personal experience, i.e., getting drafted into the United States Army after having been denied enlistment by the United States Marine Corps.
The only thing wrong with the movie is that all the Marines in Boot Camp have hair on their heads.
Thank you.
John Robert Mallernee
Bard of Clan Henderson
Armed Forces Retirement Home
Washington, D.C. 20011-8400

writesong on May 27, 2008 at 2:10 pm

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