July 17, 2009, - 8:22 pm

Buh-Bye, Walter Cronkite: He Lost the Vietnam War for U.S. on TV, Had American Blood on His Hands

By Debbie Schlussel
I just heard the news that former CBS anchorman Walter Cronkite died. And perhaps I will be one of the few with the guts to be real and say it: I’m not sad to see this overrated liar go. Buh-bye.
At 92, Cronkite enjoyed a long and glamorous life, unlike many of our late teen and 20-something American troops against whom he editorialized on a nightly basis. They died on the killing fields of Vietnam in no small part because he contributed to the video demoralization of America and the resulting lack of commitment to help our boys win the Vietnam War.
I’m sure that Cronkite will be remembered gushingly by all of the liberal mainstream media robots whom he spawned and who idolize him (and probably many gutless idiots on the right, too). In so many ways, he is their Michael Jackson, minus the creativity and talent. In life, they already exalted Cronkite far, far beyond what he deserved and completely ignored his awful transgressions against our country.

waltercronkitevietnam.jpg

Walter Cronkite Defeated America on TV

But the man they called “The Most Trusted Man in America” was really something far different: The Most Destructive Man in America. And that is how he should be remembered. He had the blood of thousands of American men–some of them really just boys–on his hands.
We may have lost the Viet Nam War on the ground because of half-hearted bureaucrats and politicians, not least among them Defense Secretary Robert McNamara who also recently passed away. But, well before that, we lost the war in a far more important theater–domestic America–because the Viet Cong’s top media general on TV, Walter Cronkite, led many offensives against our troops, every single evening.
Cronkite fought against America while in Vietnam, where he covered the Tet Offensive and lied about it to American wives, parents, and siblings of our boys on the battlefield. While the 1968 Tet Offensive was actually a victory–a tactical defeat for the Communist Viet Cong–you’d hardly know it, since Cronkite covered it as an incredible loss and gave fuel for the anti-war movement’s fire and its allies in the Congress and in Hollywood (Hanoi Jane, anyone?).
And it is in Cronkite’s coverage of Tet that America lost the Vietnam War. Most military historians regard it as the decisive battle in the war because it shifted American public opinion against the war. And Cronkite is the head atop that rotten fish.
A month later, instead of just “covering the news” in this constant lying manner, Cronkite began editorializing and delivered a scathing commentary against America’s war efforts.
Cronkite’s slogan was, “And that’s the way it is.” But if it came out of his mouth, you could be sure of one thing: that’s the way it wasn’t.
The left idolizes this man because they credit him with helping end the Vietnam War. But let’s be honest. He didn’t help end it. He helped lose it. We eventually lost it on the field because we lost it on television, first. Vietnam was the first American war shown nightly on television news. And Cronkite was the Just Lose It crowd’s Commander in Chief in that theater.
Our half-hearted efforts in Vietnam, in large part because of Walter Cronkite’s on-air attacks, have had long-lasting effects, decades later. Even Osama Bin Laden has cited them in his lack of fear in attacking America. He studied our military history, with Vietnam as its cornerstone of cutting and running. That is Walter Cronkite’s legacy. So are the generations of liars who modeled themselves after him and have spent decades on TV news tearing and dumbing down America from within.
I can’t be nice and say that Walter Cronkite should “rest in peace.”
To do so would be to ignore the posthumous wails of the restless ghosts of over 58,000 dead Americans who lost their lives so that Walter Cronkite could be a star and Vietnam could solidify its communist tilt. That’s not to mention our 153,000-plus wounded.
It is the souls of these proud Americans that I pray rest in peace, not that of the man who helped perpetrate their loss. He is soulless.
Only they–Walter Cronkite’s tens of thousands of victims–can forgive this evil man for his transgressions and journalistic crimes against them. Sadly for Cronkite, they’ve gone to a better place.
And he’s rotting somewhere else.

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132 Responses

A truly evil man.

lexi on July 17, 2009 at 10:10 pm

Thanks for having the guts to post the truth about this bastard, Debbie, My husband was a Marine in Vietnam when Cronkite declared the war lost. Thanks to him and his ilk, our brave troops had to suffer the shame of losing a war in which they never lost a battle. Thanks to liberal scumbags like this, Marines like my husband were spit on when they came home from Vietnam wearing their uniforms and called babykillers. One Marine in my husband’s unit was murdered by a hippie POS when he landed at LA Airport after 2 tours in Vietnam.
I spit on Cronkite’s soul and hope he rots in Hell.

horselady on July 17, 2009 at 10:18 pm

Good job on this, Debbie.
I said the same thing to my wife as soon as the news came about.
Good riddance.

samurai on July 17, 2009 at 10:19 pm

Spot on once again! Thank you for the searing truth of your report. Sadly truth has nothing to do with history in this country. May he rot in the seventh level of hell for his crimes against the brave men who were shipped to Vietnam only to be used as cannon fodder.

wolf2012 on July 17, 2009 at 11:03 pm

Debbie, on of your best posts in weeks. That was classic!! Great reading. Was too young to know all the differences as a child. Glad I read your obit before I read and hear the horsesh*t from Olberman, Cooper, Couric, Walters, etc. I know I won’t get the real perspective from the MSM.

californiascreaming on July 17, 2009 at 11:15 pm

Cronkite was no hero and misleading the American public as he did added some 40,000 names to the Wall in D.C. His death at 92 just proves, “only the good die young.”
On his way to hell I can only hope he has to face each and every one of my fellow brothers that he helped kill.

Lew Waters on July 17, 2009 at 11:20 pm

Thank you Debbie for telling the truth about Cronkite.

Jim on July 17, 2009 at 11:25 pm

Excellent post Debbie. Without a doubt Cronkite was one of the main instruments in turning America against the Vietnam War leading to our defeat and the deaths of millions of poor souls in South Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. I only hope he has to hear for eternity the wails of all those poor souls who lost their lives because there was no one there to protect them from the murderous Communists when we left SE Asia. Good Buy and Good Riddance Walter and, “that’s the way it is” – you’re dead and gone and I, for one, am not sorry.

Liberty on July 18, 2009 at 12:06 am

He was one of the most overrated names in journalism. Let’s face it, he was a radio announcer and hack journalist before the Second World War. If he had not been at the right place at the right time, he probably would have faded into obscurity. Many other reporters did what he did during the Second World War, but he was more successful in capitalizing on it than the others. His subseqent career as a host and newsreader at CBS is all too well known. There was no great intellect or talent at work, but just some good marketing and self-promotion. Walter Cronkite was made by CBS, and when that network had no further use for him, he was just as quickly unmade by them. Mr. Cronkite never received anything like the post retirement work he had been promised by CBS and Dan Rather, and he resented it to the end. It was a fitting punishment for such an egomaniac.

Worry01 on July 18, 2009 at 12:11 am

Thank you Debbie, you are “right on”. I served in Vietnam from 1968 to 1969 with the 25th in Cu Chi. Mr. Cronkite did more to undermine our efforts in country and because of his bias coverage, I was mocked and belittled, to say the least, when I returned to the “world” aka the States. I no longer have animosity toward him, but it has taken 40 years to do it; I just have pitty for him, that he really never understood what he did. Thanks again, Debbie. Tap it light.

A.R.Eatough on July 18, 2009 at 12:24 am

You accuse Mr Cronkite of being a liar without offering a single factual quotation or contemporary citation to back up your multiple assertions that he is a liar? Sorry but “proof by assertion” is just not credible.
Just when did he cover the Tet Offensive as an “incredible loss”. Citation please? And where is your evidence that it was actually a victory for the US and a tactical defeat for the Viet Cong as you assert? Where is your journalistic gold standard? Simply absent without leave.

Random thoughts on July 18, 2009 at 2:22 am

Most people are still hungover from the michael jackson death to give a crap about this old fart.

Squirrel3D on July 18, 2009 at 2:46 am

Random thoughts, In an October 2000 speech, retired general Fredrick Weyand said in part, “After Tet, General Westmoreland sent Walter Cronkite out to interview me. I was in Command of the Forces in the South around Saigon and below and I was proud of what we’d done. We had done a good job there. So, Walter came down and he spent about an hour and a half interviewing me. And when we got done, he said, “well you’ve got a fine story. But I’m not going to use any of it because I’ve been up to Hue. I’ve seen the thousands of bodies up there in mass graves and I’m determined to do all in my power to bring this war to an end as soon as possible.”
“It didn’t seem to matter that those thousands of bodies were of South Vietnamese citizens who had been killed by the Hanoi soldiers and Walter wasn’t alone in this because I think many in the media mirrored his view.”
“When I was in Paris at the Peace Talks, it was the most frustrating assignment I think I ever had. Sitting in that conference, week after week listening to the Hanoi negotiators, Le Duc Tho and his friends lecture us. Reading from the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Herald Tribune, the Atlanta Constitution, NBC, CBS, you name it. Their message was always the same. “Hey, read your newspapers, listen to your TV. The American people want you out of Vietnam. Now, why don’t you just go ahead and get out?” So finally a Peace Agreement was signed that everyone knew would be violated and with no recourse or hope of enforcement on our part.”
You also wish “proof” it was a loss for the Communists? Look no further than the words of former North Vietnamese Colonel Bui Tin, who accepted the surrender of Saigon. From the August 3, 1995 Wall Street Journal on the Tet Offensive, “Our losses were staggering and a complete surprise;. Giap later told me that Tet had been a military defeat, though we had gained the planned political advantages when Johnson agreed to negotiate and did not run for re-election. The second and third waves in May and September were, in retrospect, mistakes. Our forces in the South were nearly wiped out by all the fighting in 1968. It took us until 1971 to re-establish our presence, but we had to use North Vietnamese troops as local guerrillas. If the American forces had not begun to withdraw under Nixon in 1969, they could have punished us severely. We suffered badly in 1969 and 1970 as it was.”
You also have the words of North Vietnamese General Nguyen Duc Huy from an interview appearing in the October 2005 issue of Vietnam Magazine. Asked, “After the war, Giap told a group of Western reporters that Communist losses in the Tet Offensive were so devastating that if the Americans had kept up that level of military pressure much longer North Vietnam would have been forced to negotiate a peace on American terms. Do you agree?” He replied, “If the American army had fought some more, had continued, I don’t know. Maybe. I can’t say what would have happened.”
If that isn’t satisfactory, I urge you to seek out any Vietnamese refugees, especially those of the Boat People who now reside in America.

Lew Waters on July 18, 2009 at 4:10 am

Lew Waters:
It is amazing how some people still worship that old news reader. His death might bring back nostalgia for some, but not so much for Cronkite, as for the events he covered.

Worry01 on July 18, 2009 at 7:44 am

Debbie
Thanks for telling the truth about Cronkite.
The gushing of the media is shameful – even Fox News hasn’t the courage to tell it right.
Likely Johnson and Nixon LOVED Cronkite, because he gave them the political cover they needed – by fanning the flames of anti war hysteria, Cronkite gave the Administration the cover they needed to end the war, despite loss of life and shame.

Frank on July 18, 2009 at 8:27 am

Thanks Debbie for really telling it like it is. As the years pass too many forget that this talking head did more damage than not. I lump him with Hanoi Jane who did much more harm than good. Rest in H*ll cronkite.

Marc on July 18, 2009 at 8:47 am

Deborah,
Thanks for the post. Cronkite will face the consequences of his actions forever.
May God give his family confort and peace in this moment of pain..
Amen

Mats on July 18, 2009 at 9:21 am

The first time since the event announced yesterday that I have seen the truth about that blah,blah idiot.. We also might note that were it not for his efforts, we probably would be receiving 80% of our electricity from nuclear power.. I could NEVER stand watching him on his “news” programs..

Dale Johnson on July 18, 2009 at 9:58 am

The MSM’s glorifying Cronkite I could have figured, but after watching just a few minutes of FOX Snooze I thought I was going to puke!

CornCoLeo on July 18, 2009 at 10:12 am

Debbie,
I always appreciate your site, but Posted by: Random thoughts is correct.
The following are some examples of his and my problem with your post.
1 “..overrated liar” – How??
2 “..in no small part because he contributed to the video demoralization”Ôø? -How??
3 “..completely ignored his awful transgressions” – Which Were??
4 “.. was really something far different: The Most Destructive Man in America.” How So??
5 “..He had the blood of thousands of American men–some of them really just boys–on his hands.” How So??
6 “..top media general on TV, Walter Cronkite, led many offensives against our troops, every single evening.” Example??
7 “.. he covered the Tet Offensive and lied about it to American wives, parents,
and siblings of our boys on the battlefield.” Example??
Lew Waters tried to resolve by quoting “…But I’m not going to use any of it because I’ve been up to Hue.
I’ve seen the thousands of bodies up there in mass graves and I’m determined
to do all in my power to bring this war to an end as soon as possible.”
I failed to see more of a specific source than “..in an October 2000 speech” The rest of his response were quotes and
words of other North Vietnamese and others.
My point here is not to belittle your post, it is important, but to be credible and useful to those who may not be
as informed as you or Lew Waters and who may be in need of an education on what actually happened during those times I
would think it more useful to provide specific examples to back up your assertions of Cronkites failings.
It does little good to say – YOU ARE WRONG – without explaining how someone is wrong. Especially when someone is dead and
cannot defend themselves.
I was a teenager during those years and I cannot remember how Cronkite was more than a media persona reporting news.
If there is a credible expose written about him and his lack of journalistic integrity, I would be open minded and willing
to read it.
Thanks for all your work in your site and posts.

divercal on July 18, 2009 at 10:28 am

And here I thought I was the only person who regarded him as a traitor. He made it his mission to end the Vietnam War by stating, “The war is lost.” Every day he made sure he would give the daily statistics of those soldiers killed that day and the total for the war. He let his personal feelings about the war influence the way he reported it, and that is criminal.
Glad he’s gone.

ramrod on July 18, 2009 at 10:55 am

divercal, not desiring to take anyting away from Debbie’s excellent commentary, but how can you ask about credible proof of his lack of journalistic integrity when I sourced each quote I gave?
Would you actually expect his cohorts to expose him?
I question your “open-mindedness” as apparently you gave the quotes no consideration nor did you seek any of them out.
If you really desire an education of Viet Nam, why not try listening to those of us who served there and have been trying to speak the truth about it for so long?
Speaking for me and many of my fellow Viet Nam Veterans, we seek no monetary gain and receive none for speaking out. We simply want the misconceptions and lies corrected and younger people taught the truth about our effort.
If you really do wish “credible sources” on Viet Nam, I recommend to you too to seek out Vietnamese refugees and Boat People and hear their stories of our abandonment of Southeast Asia.
If they aren’t credible, I don’t know who is.

Lew Waters on July 18, 2009 at 11:44 am

Lew Walters sir, (intended with respect)
You did a very nice job of doing exactly what was missing in Debbie Schlussel’s post. Thank you for *your* thoughts and citations of sources. However, it does not repair the original flawed post my Ms. Schlussel, which was the point of my post. And thank you Mr. Walters for your service to our country. That counts a lot in my book.
Worry01,
You did not say who exactly is still worshiping Mr. Cronkite. Care to elaborate please?
Divercal,
You wrote: “And here I thought I was the only person who regarded him as a traitor. He made it his mission to end the Vietnam War by stating, “The war is lost.” Every day he made sure he would give the daily statistics of those soldiers killed that day and the total for the war. He let his personal feelings about the war influence the way he reported it, and that is criminal.
Glad he’s gone.”
I hate to inform you that there is minor amendment to the constitution called the first ammendment. It guarantees that it is ***NOT*** criminal to say or print your views within certain limits. (libel/slander) In no way is it criminal to let one’s personal views influence what you say in person or on television or in print here. Or maybe you think we are all felons for airing our thoughts? I also think those who accuse Mr. Cronkite of being a “traitor” would have an impossible case to make. Just what evidence of that would you bring to court that would stand up? Accusing someone of being a traitor is a very serious accusation.

Random thoughts on July 18, 2009 at 12:20 pm

I hope Debbie does not respond to the liberal hits on her for this post. You liberal scum (no matter how ‘politely’ you attacked Debbie) only want to believe the lies perpetrated by your media and sites like Daily Kos and Media (doesn’t) Matters. Your Muslim Marxist President is trying to take away people like Debbie’s right to tell the truth and if you succeed in removing the first amendment for us, you will pay and pay heavily for it. Nobody here gives a **** what you think.
I would spit on you just like you did to the Vietnam guys.

horselady on July 18, 2009 at 12:50 pm

Walter Cronkite is one asshole of a journalist that I can’t EVER shed a tear for. IMO, the SOB help cost us about another 40 thousand American dead in Vietnam. I say good riddance to another bad so-called newsman, that instead of reporting the news, wanted to shape policy!
http://www.9thinfantrydivision.com/html/actualenemy.htm
It was summed beautifully in another article:
“We would be wise to remember the lesson he taught us about the limits of American will in the Age of Terror. It’s better for us to win our battles fast and hard, and let the media weep for the enemy, than give the media time to dictate our strategy, and declare victory impossible.”

Jackson Pearson on July 18, 2009 at 12:59 pm

Debbie, I came on your blog this AM… Thank you for stating the truth about CRONKITE… I admired this man when he covered KENNEDY’S ASSASSINATION… Then I went into the military… His was the first account I remember of MSM “SHAPING” the news to their own agenda… I, as a VET from the NAM era, blame this man for single handedly leading the ANTI WAR MOVEMENT… We LOST A conflict that we easily were winning… Thus, snatching defeat from the jaws of victory… My last post before discharge was in WEST GERMANY… On discharge we all passed through MC GUIRE AFB, in NEW JERSEY… I had an auto that I had shipped earlier to pick up on discharge… The personnel at MC GUIRE advised us not to wear our uniforms while driving home… Being “PROUD” to have served, and HONORABLY DISCHARGED, we asked WHY??? We were advised that the MOOD of the COUNTRY had changed dramatically in the last year or so, and we would risk HUMILIATION and possible BODILY HARM if we were seen in UNIFORM… Upon my arrival back in DETROIT, and starting to live life as a civilian, I soon found out the MOOD of the country had suddenly turned very ANTI MILITARY… Sorry all you people out there who would like to REVISE HISTORY, but this is how it happened, and you cannot change my view of HISTORY… Finally to paraphrase a “CATCHY PHRASE”, that was the way it was…

joezphx on July 18, 2009 at 1:11 pm

“That’s not to mention our 153,000-plus wounded.”
And let’s not forget the 100s of thousnds of us who were drafed and also served but did not go to Nam. We had to watch… and in some cases, listen… and transcribe…
“advised us not to wear our uniforms while driving home…”
joezphx
I left mine in a locker on a mountain in Germany…

PIF on July 18, 2009 at 1:42 pm

Apparently, some people in this thread are not shy about tossing names around. eg. “liberal scum, asshole, traitor,” etc. To wit:
Horselady, who are the “liberal scum” you are referring to? If it is me, I don’t think I’ve said much to allow you to classify me as a liberal. I don’t think anyone who knows me would call me a liberal, much less liberal scum. In any case, you seem intolerant of views other than your own, which in my experience impairs learning new things. In any case, yes, I do believe the first amendment is a good idea. But more importantly, it is the law of the land. It enables you and I to share our views and it enabled Mr. Cronkite to share his.
I also think the 2nd Amendment is a good idea and pay a fair amount of money and time every year to defend it. You don’t hear a lot of liberal scum saying that. I also insist on journalistic standards which were lacking in Ms. Schlussel’s post. If that makes me liberal scum, then so be it.
A different ‘random thought’:
IMO, the images flowing from Viet Nam were its undoing and turned the tide of American and world opinion. They brought the realities of the war into the living room and swayed opinion to say “enough”.

Random thoughts on July 18, 2009 at 2:01 pm

Walter Cronkite, led many offensives against our troops, every single evening…
WHAT motherfuckin’ news channel were YOU watching???
i can’t name A SINGLE JEW who went to Viet Nam in my predominantly Jewish neighbourhood—but remember the SCORES OF BODYBAGS coming home to Black, well they were Nigroes then, Irish, Italian and Hispanic families—so HOW DARE YOU talk about “our” troops???
And WHAT did they die for???!!!!
NOT from saving the world for democracy, but to maintain French imperialist interests in Southeast Asia. Wonder if your neo-nazi sycophants realise you’re a Jewess?
[ER: SCREW YOU. MY FATHER WAS DRAFTED AND SERVED IN THE ARMY DURING VIETNAM. SO DID HIS ENTIRE GRADUATING CLASS FROM MEDICAL SCHOOL, MOST OF WHOM WERE JEWS. THOUSANDS OF JEWISH AMERICANS SERVED AND FOUGHT IN VIETNAM AND MANY DIED THERE. WATCH THE MOVIE, "WE WERE SOLDIERS," AND SEE THE LISTING AT THE END OF THE SOLDIERS WHO DIED JUST AT ONE BATTLE. PLENTY HAVE VERY JEWISH NAMES. YOU ARE A FRICKING LIAR. YOU SOUND LIKE ANTI-SEMITE PAT BUCHANAN HERE. GO TO HELL. DS]

EminemsRevenge on July 18, 2009 at 2:30 pm

BTW Debbie, thanks for posting this thread, and one more tidbit:
I hope that Walter Cronkite is met with, by the 40 thousand that he has blood on his hands for. I further hope that this scum-bag journalist is butt fucked by them, for eternity.

Jackson Pearson on July 18, 2009 at 2:43 pm

Eminems Revenge, MY JEWISH HUSBAND enlisted in the USMC and did two tours in Vietnam. You don’t know anything. And in case you don’t know it, you antisemitic schmuck, Nazis and Islamists have a lot more in common with you Liberals than they do with conservatives.

horselady on July 18, 2009 at 2:54 pm

My father fought in Vietnam.
Let’s also not forget the two million Khmer victims because of the systematic genocide in Cambodia. This would never have happened if Walter Cronkite and his fellow liberals did not lie on television about the war in Vietnam and turn public opinion against stopping communist aggression in Asia.
If we had won, the Khmer Rouge in neighboring Cambodia would never have had the chance to commit genocide.

Gabe on July 18, 2009 at 4:21 pm

IMO, images like these hastened the end of the United States’ involvement in the Viet Nam war.
Here’s the image of peasant girl Kim Phuc, naked, screaming in pain after being hit by a napalm bomb.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/index.html?curid=20130624
And General Nguyen summarily executing an alleged Viet Cong prisoner:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nguyen.jpg
Were the photographers also traitors for capturing these images? Were the publishers of the newspapers and magazines that printed these images also traitors? I think a lot of people in this thread are using their first amendment rights on a daily basis. And when Walter Cronkite uses his first amendment rights he is suddenly a “traitor”. If you believe in the Bill of Rights and our constitution you should be strenuously defending ***all*** of our rights to render our opinions without fear of being judged “criminal”, even if those opinions are exactly the opposite of your views… even if those opinions make your blood boil.

Random thoughts on July 18, 2009 at 6:18 pm

RIH Walter Crapcake. Here’s hoping Teddy Kennedy
will hurry up and keep you company.

demonneant on July 18, 2009 at 6:24 pm

Debbie,
You are so wrong it is beyond belief.
Walter Cronkite did NOT say the war was lost.
He said “Ôø?To say that we are mired in stalemate seems the only realistic, yet unsatisfactory, conclusion.Ôø?
DO you know what a stalemate is? It’s a draw.
Like the current “project” of giving Iraq democracy, the whole “project” of giving Vietnam democracy was a mistake, and anybody who disagrees with that statement is a fool.
If we were winning, (Which we were NOT), what makes you think a reporter thousands of miles away “cost” us the war. IF WE WERE WINNING, WE WOULDN’T HAVE WITHDRAWN.
The generals knew it was a lost cause, but followed orders anyway. They did not listen to Eisenhower, who said the country was following a Military Complex…. You, Like LBJ, Nixon, and George W. Bush, seem to think that American should just go into countries and fight them because we have a different government system.
You weren’t even born when he said this statement, yet you seem to think you know everything about it? BS
The whole discussion leads to this questions:
Do you think Vietnam was worth it? If so, should we invade China or Cuba? Should we invade Canada because they are socialist? When does it end, elephant?
Are you one of the people who actually think we won the Vietnam War?
I sure hope not. The only war that was worth fighting for was World War 2, and the first Gulf War.

David Edwards on July 18, 2009 at 6:26 pm

Random Thoughts:
Great post. See, the Elephants and other conservatives like to have things go a certain way, and if they don’t go a certain, way then they say “The world is going to hell.”
Not all elephants say this, but retarded ones like Schlussel say that Cronkite is in hell, or that he cost us the war of public opinion, blah blah blah.
But your photographs were part of the leading movement against the war. The draft didn’t help either. America did not want to see 58,000+ boys and men die for a stupid reason like fighting communism. Most of them didn’t care about communism, or any other ideology. They were led to their deaths by their leaders.
Debbie seems to be very pro-war. Yet, she never has joined any Armed Service Group. Her hero is her father, who guided her to think that government should not interfere in peoples’ lives, except for Moral/Personal Issues, then it’s ok.
She thinks that anyone who questions their government is a traitor. But the real disgrace are the people like Debbie who follow their leaders like sheep, whether its to the battlefields of Iraq or Vietnam.

David Edwards on July 18, 2009 at 6:44 pm

Geez, don’t know where to start.
Let’s be accurate about his on-air quote please:
“To say that we are closer to victory today is to believe, in the face of the evidence, the optimists who have been wrong in the past. To suggest we are on the edge of defeat is to yield to unreasonable pessimism. To say that we are mired in stalemate seems the only realistic, yet unsatisfactory, conclusion”.
And sorry all of you sour-grapers, he was dead on. He didn’t cover it as “an incredible loss”. Here’s what he said in his wrapup:
“Who won and who lost in the great Tet offensive against the cities? I’m not sure. The Vietcong did not win by a knockout, but neither did we”.
Ooops, darn facts. Never stopped you before, though did it Debbie?
It’s funny that the revisionists claim that this was an incredible victory for the US solely based on the casualty statistics and the fact that we won back some ground that we temporarily lost. It was clear at that point that it wasn’t about raw statistics. It’s claimed that because of Cronkite, we didn’t send another 200,000 troops into Vietnam and this caused us to lose the war. We hadn’t come close to winning it with a million allied troops and it was obvious that the enemy could lose 4 times our casualties and still continue to fight the warfare that THEY were comfortable with.
Nay, Cronkite probably saved another few tens of thousand American lives, not cost the blood of thousands of American boys (and girls – shame on you Debbie).
So, get off your character assassination horse and attack someone who can defend themselves.
Unlike YOU, I have served as an Infantryman in the US Army (but not in Vietnam, it’s true, only stationed 75 miles from the East German border during the Reagan era). It’s easy for you to sit in your padded cell and type hateful screeds.
Finally, all of you folks need to stop saying that Cronkite said that we had “lost the war”. it didn’t happen. I’m talking to the bitter horselady above all. I guess folks like you and Debbie have lost their basic humanity. Sucks for you.

dw on July 18, 2009 at 7:01 pm

Yea blame Cronkite for how the war turned out,do not blame the lairs that got America into the war in the first place and continued too lie during the war. Cronkite just got tired of all of the garbage and lies that was spewing out by the government and correctly decided the war could not be won, he was correct BTW. General Vo Nguyn Giap never said that they were ready too surrender, but stayed in the war because of the protesters.
http://www.snopes.com/quotes/giap.asp
Blame Cronkite, Kerry, or Fonda all you want, but America did not understand the Vietnamese people or how or why they fought. They did not care about casualty counts or land lost or won they just would continue the fight no matter what and would never give up.

timewave on July 18, 2009 at 7:29 pm

My oh my, the leftists must have gotten the message to come over here. Nice work, Debbie!
Let’s be clear that Cronkite was a stinking anti-American leftist (forgive the redundancy) and a lousy journalist. The latter is particularly important, as he helped popularize and legitimate the now omnipresent journalist practice of pretending to do fact-based journalism while in reality doing opinion journalism. Granted, one’s opinions come through in what one investigates and one’s frames of reference, but the goal of reporting the facts moderates the tendency just to run with one’s prejudices.
That said, it is just not true to claim that Cronkite turned the American people against the war and thus caused us to lose it. What did that was the major increase in the rate at which Americans were killed. And THAT had everything to do with a poor understanding at the top about how to prosecute this war and a contemptuous dismissal of the consequences for public opinion as this ignorance continued. Yes, there is no question that the US resoundingly won Tet. There is also some reason to believe that the US could have won this war, if it began with Tet, but there was a history that had already unfolded. Given that Tet was a highly unusual mistake for the Communists (they got too confident and actually tried to confront American troops head-on), one would expect that if this war continued, the commies would never have made this mistake again. Do we know that the American military had finally figured out how to handle what was (at that time) a radically new type of enemy organization? Maybe. But Tet did not establish this as fact, as it was, as I said, uncharacteristic.
Let’s also be candid that part of Cronkite’s influence probably depended on LBJ’s decision not to run for reelection (which was probably a mistake on his part, as he took anti-war protesters as representative of the mass) and on Nixon’s forced resignation in disgrace for an unrelated reason.
Naturally, nothing I’ve said here disagrees with Debbie’s opinion about Cronkite, and I am delighted to read it on a high-profile blog.

skZion on July 18, 2009 at 8:01 pm

Cronkite was by no means the first in the media to use the bully pulpit to manipulate public opinion against the Vietnam War – not even counting the David Halberstams and Peter Arnetts of the world, many of Cronkite’s own colleagues at CBS had been doing likewise with their hit “pieces,” going back to Morley Safer’s “reportage” on an incident at Cam Ne in 1965 – but “Uncle” Walter was definitely the highest profile in that regard and, as you noted, the worst.
Even the tone in his voice varied when covering certain stories. Compare his reportage of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover’s death in 1972 (where his delivery seemed to have a “ding dong, the witch is dead” feel to it, and of course rubbing in the leftists’ hatred of Hoover) to when Harry Truman died towards the end of that year. This is but a clue of where Walter leaned.
And then of course, there was his pro-U.N./”One World” sympathies and his dismissal of U.N. opponents as “Christian fundamentalists” – not to mention his contributing to the Huffington Post in his later years . . .

ConcernedPatriot on July 18, 2009 at 8:43 pm

“My oh my, the leftists must have gotten the message to come over here. Nice work, Debbie”!
Gee, I must not have gotten the memo from my socialist cell leader. I found this post through some blog collecting site. Sorry to have soiled your sandbox. But frankly, it’s already pretty rotten as it is.
“And THAT had everything to do with a poor understanding at the top about how to prosecute this war”.
Yep. However, I’d argue that this was a war that had a very poor chance of being won in the first place.
The Petraeus surge philosphy *might* have worked, but I doubt that our military had the ability to understand the nuances of this sort of tactic at that time in history. Sadly, the surge that they had planned that Johnson decided not to pursue was probably just more of the same. Throw a bunch of bodies against the wall and see how many would stick. There’s a difference between the realization that you’re going to have to send people to their death in war and using soldiers as cannon fodder.
“Naturally, nothing I’ve said here disagrees with Debbie’s opinion about Cronkite, and I am delighted to read it on a high-profile blog”.
Sadly, part of the reason that this blog is “high profile” is based on statements like this:
“Only they–Walter Cronkite’s tens of thousands of victims–can forgive this evil man for his transgressions and journalistic crimes against them. Sadly for Cronkite, they’ve gone to a better place.
And he’s rotting somewhere else”.
And filth attracts filth.
Talk about evil.

dw on July 18, 2009 at 8:45 pm

Insipid Hagiography: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090718/ap_on_re_us/us_obit_walter_cronkite

Worry01 on July 18, 2009 at 8:48 pm

Squirrel 3d quoted:
“Random thoughts, In an October 2000 speech, retired general Fredrick Weyand said in part, “After Tet, General Westmoreland sent Walter Cronkite out to interview me. I was in Command of the Forces in the South around Saigon and below and I was proud of what we’d done. We had done a good job there. So, Walter came down and he spent about an hour and a half interviewing me. And when we got done, he said, “well you’ve got a fine story. But I’m not going to use any of it because I’ve been up to Hue. I’ve seen the thousands of bodies up there in mass graves and I’m determined to do all in my power to bring this war to an end as soon as possible.”
“It didn’t seem to matter that those thousands of bodies were of South Vietnamese citizens who had been killed by the Hanoi soldiers and Walter wasn’t alone in this because I think many in the media mirrored his view.”
“When I was in Paris at the Peace Talks, it was the most frustrating assignment I think I ever had. Sitting in that conference, week after week listening to the Hanoi negotiators, Le Duc Tho and his friends lecture us. Reading from the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Herald Tribune, the Atlanta Constitution, NBC, CBS, you name it. Their message was always the same. “Hey, read your newspapers, listen to your TV. The American people want you out of Vietnam. Now, why don’t you just go ahead and get out?” So finally a Peace Agreement was signed that everyone knew would be violated and with no recourse or hope of enforcement on our part.”
Is this the same General Weyland who said privately to The new York Times in 1967, “Iíve destroyed a single division three times . . . Iíve chased main-force units all over the country and the impact was zilch. It meant nothing to the people. Unless a more positive and more stirring theme than simple anti-communism can be found, the war appears likely to go on until someone gets tired and quits, which could take generations.”
Why, yes it is. when he goes to his maker, is he going to “rot somewhere else as well”? I hope you put him in his place while he’s still alive, since he was part of the military establishment prosecuting the war and he had come to the same conclusion as Cronkite. I guess he has plenty of blood on his hands as well. Why don’t you go attack THAT 92 year old dude? He’s only a couple months older than Cronkite was. He’s getting ready to celebrate his 93rd birthday as well. Are he and Cronkite going to be able to play spades in hell when he finally gets there?

dw on July 18, 2009 at 8:52 pm

Random Thoughts:
“Worry01,
You did not say who exactly is still worshiping Mr. Cronkite. Care to elaborate please?”
Evidently you did, since you rose to the bait like a trout.

Worry01 on July 18, 2009 at 8:53 pm

I always thought he was an empty suit fake who could read a telemprompter like a pro. Wait…that sounds too familiar….

drjmr2000 on July 18, 2009 at 10:09 pm

I always thought he was an empty suit fake who could read a telemprompter like a pro. Wait…that sounds too familiar….

drjmr2000 on July 18, 2009 at 10:09 pm

In response to my comment, “My oh my, the leftists must have gotten the message to come over here,” dw sez:
“Gee, I must not have gotten the memo from my socialist cell leader. I found this post through some blog collecting site.”
Red herring. Try to read carefully and respond honestly. A “blog collecting site” is one of several ways that leftists could be directed here. There is no need for a traditional cell structure. When a deluge of unusual (for this blog) posts come in one after the other, there is some external force in play.
“. . . filth attracts filth.”
Why thank you. You clearly know the importance of starting off on the right foot. Daily Kos or Puffington Host couldn’t have said it better.
“I’d argue that this was a war that had a very poor chance of being won in the first place.”
I’d argue that this assertion is too vague to be testable and is therefore not an argument.
“The Petraeus surge philosphy *might* have worked, but I doubt that our military had the ability to understand the nuances of this sort of tactic at that time in history.”
Well let’s see. Where do think the data came from to suggest a “surge”? Since we’ve had nothing like Vietnam since Vietnam, it must have come largely from the Vietnam experience. If so, the logical follow-up question is to ask when this “experience” yielded useful information. Was it near the end of the Vietnam war, or was the information acquired by a review of data many years later? I do not know, though I expect it would not take too much targeted research to get an answer.
The main point, though, is that Cronkite was a leftist through and through. This became indisputable toward his end. And, simply put, a leftist always tends to see America as a source of evil in the world. The damage he did by shaping later generations of journalists is patently obvious. The collective impact, directly and indirectly, on America’s so-called intelligentsia would make for an interesting study. What many of us are confident about, however, is that when leftists (such as you) are unable to focus on anything other than America’s alleged deformities, decency is the first casualty.
As for why Debbie’s blog is “high-profile,” I rather doubt that this is mainly owing to her swashbuckling style, but rather that she actually researches important stories that others miss and draws interesting connections. In other words, she is a serious opinion journalist, and these are rare birds nowadays.

skZion on July 18, 2009 at 10:24 pm

~and to think all this time I considered him just another asshole on TV.

#1Vato on July 18, 2009 at 11:16 pm

“In response to my comment, “My oh my, the leftists must have gotten the message to come over here,” dw sez:
“Gee, I must not have gotten the memo from my socialist cell leader. I found this post through some blog collecting site.”
Red herring. Try to read carefully and respond honestly”.
It was a sarcastic comment, nothing more.
“A “blog collecting site” is one of several ways that leftists could be directed here”.
And it could be exactly what it was – a random collection of posts collected from several sources. You’re welcome to speculate on all sorts of sinister Leftist internet traffic-routing routines though.
“There is no need for a traditional cell structure. When a deluge of unusual (for this blog) posts come in one after the other, there is some external force in play”.
Well, having reviewed the record, I’d hardly count my post as part of a “deluge”. BTW, this isn’t my first visit to DS’s site. I was first made aware of it by a Libertarian blog a few months back. Frankly, I think you’re being weird about this, but that’s just me, I guess.
“. . . filth attracts filth.”
Why thank you”.
You’re welcome.
“You clearly know the importance of starting off on the right foot”.
What – I’m supposed to toe the party line? Isn’t that the Communist Way? When you have people wishing that Cronkite is ‘butt-fucked” in the after life, when you have famous bloggers talking about someone who’s not even in the ground “rotting somewhere”, when you have people saying things like “Rest in Hell, Mr. Cronkite”, I think that filth is a pretty good word. And I’d say that if people said that about George Bush.
“Daily Kos or Puffington Host couldn’t have said it better”.
Desipte your misspelling, thank you. I’m assuming that it’s a compliment. Frankly, believe it or not, I think I’ve gone to The Huffington Post twice. And I don’t know what the first reference is about.
“I’d argue that this was a war that had a very poor chance of being won in the first place.”
I’d argue that this assertion is too vague to be testable and is therefore not an argument”.
Perhaps. But in the absense of evidence to the contrary, I’d say that your objection is also too vague to even be addressed.
“The Petraeus surge philosphy *might* have worked, but I doubt that our military had the ability to understand the nuances of this sort of tactic at that time in history.”
Well let’s see. Where do think the data came from to suggest a “surge”?”
I’m not sure what you’re trying to say, but I’d say that sending another 20% more troops in a short period of time would be considered a “surge”. That’s what was planned before Johnson realized that Cronkite was possibly indicative of the general feeling of the American public, whether right or wrong. What I’m suggesting (and perhaps you misread what I was trying to say) is that a Petraeus-type strategy MIGHT have actually worked (something that General Weyland himself seemed to be indicating when he said, “IÔø?ve chased main-force units all over the country and the impact was zilch. It meant nothing to the people. Unless a more positive and more stirring theme than simple anti-communism can be found, the war appears likely to go on until someone gets tired and quits, which could take generations”.
“Since we’ve had nothing like Vietnam since Vietnam, it must have come largely from the Vietnam experience”.
Not sure where this is going. Perhaps you could be more clear.
“If so, the logical follow-up question is to ask when this “experience” yielded useful information. Was it near the end of the Vietnam war, or was the information acquired by a review of data many years later? I do not know, though I expect it would not take too much targeted research to get an answer”.
Still not sure where you are going with this. If you are simply saying that using the recent surge strategy, which seems to have been as successful as was possible in Iraq (nothing else seemed to be working) is useless to apply to Vietnam, I might agree with you because it sort of reinforces what I was saying.
“The main point, though, is that Cronkite was a leftist through and through”.
Yes, Vietnam seemed to push him leftward. So? Schlussel is a rightist. FoxNews is predominately rightist, which seems to almost be treasonist these days, at least if we judge them by the standards that they have promulgated during the Bush administration, i.e. criticize the Administration and you can’t be a patriot and are probably a traitor who needs to leave the country if you don’t like the way the country is being run.
“This became indisputable toward his end. And, simply put, a leftist always tends to see America as a source of evil in the world”.
Bullshit. I’m left of center in many things (probably more than Cronkite ever was). I don’t feel that way and I served my country in the most basic way a person could, as a simple Infantryman, whose job it was to defend the airfield at Bremen Germany and die in place in order to gain the US time to get troops over from the States in the event of the 3rd Shock Army coming over across the North German plain. My very unit is namechecked in General hackett’s book “World War III”. He estimated my unit’s lifespan after an invasion at about 72 hours.
“The damage he did by shaping later generations of journalists is patently obvious”.
To people with axes to grind. If it means “Look critically at the issues”, then I ask, “what’s wrong with that”? If it means that he engendered types like the whining, almost out-of-control Glenn Becks and Debbie Schussels, then I guess I’d have to say, “Bad on you Walter”, just like the rest of you.
“The collective impact, directly and indirectly, on America’s so-called intelligentsia would make for an interesting study”.
Hmmmm, you make “intellignetsia” sound so dirty. It’s weird how the Right seems to hate intelligent thought. It’s like garlic to a vampire.
“What many of us are confident about, however, is that when leftists (such as you) are unable to focus on anything other than America’s alleged deformities, decency is the first casualty”.
You call the language in this post and the comments that it’s engendered “decency”? Really?
I guess I was so obsessed by our “defomities” that I served in Reagan’s military. How very subversive of me.
“As for why Debbie’s blog is “high-profile,” I rather doubt that this is mainly owing to her swashbuckling style, but rather that she actually researches important stories that others miss and draws interesting connections”.
You mean like saying that “Walter Cronkite, led many offensives against our troops, every single evening” or “Cronkite covered it as an incredible loss” (the record shows otherwise). hell, she wasn’t even BORN until 1969. She’s sure quick to make judgments based on passed down right-wing tropes. At least I can say I saw Cronkite at the time that he was broadcasting.
“In other words, she is a serious opinion journalist, and these are rare birds nowadays”.
She’s a harpie. Sorry. And they are a dime-a-dozen these days, both on the left AND the Right.

dw on July 18, 2009 at 11:35 pm

“”The Petraeus surge philosphy *might* have worked, but I doubt that our military had the ability to understand the nuances of this sort of tactic at that time in history.”
Well let’s see. Where do think the data came from to suggest a “surge”?”
I’m not sure what you’re trying to say”
Ahhh, I get where you’re coming from. The failure in Vietnam helped add data to the body of military strategy without which the surge strategy in Iraq might never have been formulated. I don’t deny this. But you might also say that since they didn’t have a “Vietnam Experience” to draw on, since they were in the middle of it, then it’s certainly possible that the additional 200,000 troops that they were planning to send (until Cronkite apparently single-handedly controlled Pentagon and Administration policy and prevented them from sending them) might have simply continued the war in its current trajectory. And if that’s true, then Cronkite was INDEED a hero after all because he might have saved many more lives by showing Johnson the light.
PS, just so you know, I became eligible for the draft in 1972 when I turned 18, the last year of the draft. My number was something like 240, which meant that I was virtually assured of not being called up. I didn’t join the Army for another 10 years, where I was the oldest member of my basic training unit (28 yrs old). That was Feb. 1982.

dw on July 19, 2009 at 12:04 am

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