May 23, 2010, - 8:26 pm

What is the Draw of “Lost”? Are You Watching Tonight’s Finale?

By Debbie Schlussel

I don’t get the draw of “Lost,” the ABC serial drama, which ends tonight.

lost

A few years ago, just before the show began, I was intrigued by the PR about the soon-to-air new series and watched the first two episodes.  But then, it lost me.  The idea of a commercial airliner (Oceanic Flight 815) crashing on a mysterious island, with most of its passengers surviving, interested me.  But it seemed like the writers were making it up as they went along, with monsters and flashbacks and other things I cannot describe as anything but stupidity.

So, it wasn’t for me.  Plus, I hate a show to which I must play slave.  If you miss one episode, you’ve missed everything.  But people who follow this show are fanatics.  They are slavishly devoted.  Has the show gotten that good since I left after only the second episode?  Is it that exciting and suspenseful?  In reading all the hype, I feel like maybe I missed out.  Did I? (Well, there’s always DVD.)

At 7:00 p.m. Tonight, a tribute show, featuring the show’s many actors, aired, followed by a synopsis of the story.  And then the two-and-a-half hour finale begins.  Plus, after that–if you’re not “Lost”ed out–there’s a special latenight episode of “Jimmy Kimmel Live” dedicated to the show’s finale.

If you’re watching, you probably aren’t reading this.  But in the off chance that you’re a “Lost’ devotee and you read this (or are in a different time zone in which it isn’t airing yet), why–what’s so great about this show?  Why do you like it?  What is it about “Lost” that made it must viewing for you for the last five years?

On another note, I’m glad the show created jobs for so many Americans in Hawaii, where the show was filmed.  Here’s an interesting Wall Street Journal article about the depressed Hawaiian employees, who are unsure about their futures, now that their TV cash cow has died.  A Hawaiian foam producer says the show was his second biggest account.

Exit Question:  What the heck is the “DHARMA Initiative”?  Not kidding.  I really wanna know.

Exit Question 2:  Do they ever get rescued?

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56 Responses

This show had deep spiritual messages and scriptural parallels but only for people with eyes to see and ears to hear what the Lord is telling us in this story. Common people, with names like Christian, Jacob, John, Benjamin,Aaron,Daniel, & the Man in Black, vs the Man in white i.e. Satan vs. Jesus, good vs. evil, believers vs, non-believers, ect…ect…ect…Or how about the “light” that appeared to be God himself or @ the very least, a look into the Garden of Eden, and was it not said that a part of that special “light”, was inside each & everybody on earth, and if that light goes out, humans will be extinct? Is that NOT a metaphor for the holy Spirit? How bout the Dr. who was Godless, but then was touched by Jacob and Saw the light in the lighthouse, and got so much faith, that he knew he was one of Gods “chosen people” and had a purpose for his life ? You think these writers intended there to be so many references to scripture or was the Lord speaking to us thru them, whether these goofball writers knew it or not?

Who cares? on May 25, 2010 at 11:09 am

Give a little about my history with “Lost’.
I did not watch “Lost” for much of the time it was showing, nor did I know much about it. I had been watching “Desperate Housewives” on dvd with another person (I had been enjoying season 3 and I think I started season 4 and I had wanted to revisit how the show used to be in season 1 and it ended up being all of season 1 and then 2–which I had not seen–and so on)… once I was finished with that I was thinking of doing another series on dvd and thought of “Lost”. Knowing that ABC had the show on its site I decided to try out the first episode. I reminded me of the direction of Steven Spielberg and I enjoyed it. I decided to try the next episode and then after that I started the next (not that I was planning to watch a whole season, but after the end of one episode I wanted to see what happened next). I was watching episodes since I wanted to know what was going on and I thought the next episodes might answer it (like how movies give an answer to a mystery early and then build the story off the solution to the mystery)–but I did not realize they mysteries would mostly hold into the end of the series. I was not planning to watch a whole series. I ended up doing a marathon of sorts of “Lost”, watching one episode after another, and I think I was planning to stop after I got the answers I sought. I went into the show basically cold so I did not know so much what would happen and the revelations were mostly revelations to me (as opposed to people who would read ahead of time what was going to happen). I was trying to be careful with what was online with the show as I did not want to know ahead of time who would live and continue into the 4th season and who would die. The fourth season was coming to its finale soon and I ended up watching up through the point it was showing on tv (so I caught up) and then I started watching the show on tv (in HD). I was under the impression the 4th season was supposed to be the last (and then I found out I was wrong). I did not know if I would continue with season 5 and then 6. I think watching “Lost” in this manner is the best way, as all the episodes seemed like small parts in a long story (as opposed to watching one episode and then having to wait a week). It was enjoyable that way.

Why were people devoted to “Lost”? At least two reasons–character relationships (who would end up with whom… “love” stories), and mysteries–people would tune in each week to find out the solutions to what was going on and often were treated to twists and major surprises. It seemed as if the individual mysteries were connected so that having all the answers together would create a larger story, almost as if what was going on in the show was a backdrop to the real story (at least, that is how it seems to me). Also, what appealed to me was that the show was shot like a movie and looks more like that than a tv show (the orchestral score adds to that)–plus the locations, the viewers would get shots of the beauty of Hawaii (vs. seeing characters in a room on a sitcom), like seeing vast views of mountains and grass and sky with the characters being small by comparison, showing the scope… although the finale was disappointing (the twist of the finale was like a combination of the twists of “The Sixth Sense” and “Carnival of Souls” + the ending of “Somewhere in Time”, complete with bright light), it was better than most, if not all, finales since something was actually done with it (rather than it being static, or the show just ending with things going on as before).

MH on May 26, 2010 at 2:20 am

Answer to “Exit Question 2: Do they ever get rescued?”. This is spoiler for someone who has not watched. Yes, twice (sort of). Mid point of the series a group called “Oceanic Six” are rescued the Island but go back, but at the end, they get themselves off the island. at One of the last shots of the series is a plane with some of the cast flying off (vastly reduced number from the orignal cast), many had died by that point and three characters decide to stay. Those three and almost all from the plane, however, in the twist ending, are shown to have died.
Although answered before: “Exit Question: What the heck is the ‘DHARMA Initiative’?” The island had a source of tremendous electromagnetic energy, and a scientific group came to the island to explore this energy. That group was the DHARMA Initiative. If you want the whole story of “Lost” summed up, it seems that it is about a group of people who want to protect the energy, another group who wants to use it and a group of plane crash survivors inbetween. If something “bad” happened to the energy it was supposedly to mean the end of the world but the focus was on the island so we did not get to see that and so the show seemed to have the potential for a large scope, but ended up seeming to have a small one–but the writers made it how they wanted it to be.

MH on May 26, 2010 at 2:38 am

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