November 16, 2007, - 3:04 pm

Does Stephen King Hate Christians?

By Debbie Schlussel
I’m not sure what Stephen King thinks of Christians. Maybe those of you who read a lot of his work can tell me. But if “The Mist“–a movie out Wednesday for the big Thanksgiving Weekend–is true to his novella, “Skeleton Crew,” on which it’s based, then he certainly doesn’t care too much for them.
I can’t post a complete review here until late Tuesday Night, but the fact is that, in “The Mist,” the biggest villain besides a mysterious mist produced by (who else?) the military (guess King doesn’t like our troops so much either) is a Christian woman, who wears her religion on her sleeve. Played by Marcia Gay Harden, the Christian woman resembles the Fred Phelps folks from the Westboro Baptist Church who protest at troops’ funerals and shriek our troops deserve to die because of our sins. This woman echoes them and blames the plaugue of the mist (and the monsters it spawns) on our sins. Among them, she cites abortion and stem cell research. And she causes the murder–the “sacrifice”–of innocent soldiers. Just like the Phelps team.

themist.jpg

Um, here’s a newsflash: Conservatives and religious Christians detest the Phelps crew of protestors. We don’t agree with them. And we’re not like them, no matter what Stephen King thinks.
Yup, the evil conservative Christian preaching against abortion and stem cells and sexual promiscuity is America’s greatest villain, in the eyes of this movie.
Sad that King can’t find a more believable enemy than that. Looks like the mind of King has gone feeble.

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37 Responses

Debbie, I don’t know if Stephen hates Christians but if he does it’s not a recent thing. I read this story over twenty-five years ago in an anthology and it’s unchanged and unedited. My guess is he doesn’t. If you’ve ever read “The Stand” his basic theme in the novel is one of good vs evil and the main hero of the story is an old woman named “Mother Abigail” who is a devout Christian.

Rich B on November 16, 2007 at 3:32 pm

    King doesn’t hate all Christians, just Protestants; see Needful Things (the Catholics in the novel are portrayed as logical, but the Protestants are shown as ignorant and repugnant). Apparently Stephen King likes the Catholics since they made good use of things like the Pear of Anguish, Breast Rippers and the Rack. He likes things like that.

    John Krauss on August 26, 2011 at 10:38 pm

Since most of King’s stories are based in Maine, it’s going to be hard for him to find a reason to insert a Nazihomoislamofacist into the narrative, Debbie.
But quick, hop into the wayback machine, and go back to 1979 and have him try!
And convince him to change the part about the military weapons test causing the mist to having a Democratically-led Congress passing pro-Mist legislation.

The Klute on November 16, 2007 at 3:46 pm

It is an old short story of his.
*** SPOILERS FROM STORY ***
The army guys commit suicide because they know what the mist brings. The lady spouting off was fairly minor in the book. She didn’t do much more than talk before the main characters decided it was time to get out of there. King only hinted that people were going to start looking for scapegoats. If I remember correctly, the male lead had a sexual encounter with the lead female although he was married. The next day they try to get to his wife but can’t. It sounds like typical Hollywood changes.

Terrahawk on November 16, 2007 at 4:28 pm

Actually, it was more than a short story. It was a novella. Not quite long enough to publish on its own. The woman in the story was one, if not the main antagonist. She did demand a sacrafice of the male charactors son and she was a fundalmentalist nut. In the end of the story, before the main charactor and his son make their break, the woman gets attacked and killed (my memory is hazy on that one). Her name was Mrs Carmody if I remember right. Someone correct me if I’m wrong. From the trailers I’ve seen they have tried (somewhat) to remain true to the novella. I last read this over twenty years ago so I may be off.

Rich B on November 16, 2007 at 5:22 pm

I don’t know if he is anti-christian, but don’t think he is exactly pro-christian either. I too, have read a lot of King’s stuff. But it kept getting stranger as time passed by. I don’t mean strange in a good way either. In fact, it became downright lame.

Rocky on November 16, 2007 at 5:41 pm

Those Fred Phelps people are VERY SCARY!

LoveAManInAUniform on November 16, 2007 at 6:19 pm

in his NIGHTLINE interview 11/16 he was asked his opinion of religion.
he stated that organized religion “gives him the creeps.”

louielouie on November 17, 2007 at 1:09 pm

If King wants to rant about religious fanaticism, he should first look at Saudi Arabia and elsewhere in the middle-east and see how rape victims and homosexuals are handled but he won’t look because he is blinded with contempt and disdain towards Christians. What makes him think he is more tolerant than them anyways?King is too busy attacking ministers for condemning same sex marriage and rampant sexual decedency but has no words to reprimand Achmadinejad for hanging gays on a crane in public or stoning women to death who were alleged of illicit promiscuous behaviour/rape.
Admittedly,I only read one of his novels. Maybe I’ll do a political assesment on each novelist before reading his/her book from here on.

Jew Chick on November 18, 2007 at 7:47 pm

Jew Chick,
The story “The Mist” was published back in 1980, which means it was probably written in 1979 or earlier, which predates Ahmadinejad by, what, 22 years? But you’re right, he should have hopped into the TARDIS and saw Iran would be like before he wrote this horror story set in Maine.
“Admittedly,I only read one of his novels.”
Which obviously qualifies you to… oh wait, it doesn’t.

The Klute on November 18, 2007 at 8:22 pm

I didn’t read the novella, but I saw “The Mist” at a free preview screening in NYC two Friday’s ago. Needless to say, I thought the anti-military, anti-religious screeds in the movie were waaaaay over the top. The ending was also telegraphed when the father, son, woman, older woman, and older man, escaped to the home of the ‘hero’, searching for his wife. Plus, Andre Braugher’s character (an actor I enjoy) was absolutely silly, even for a lawyer. What lawyer wouldn’t want to see proof, except for maybe an ACLU one? Glad I didn’t pay for this dreck, even as a rental.

Rick on November 19, 2007 at 11:59 am

I’ve read almost everything King has written (except the Mist and one or two others). He’s not particularly anti-Christian; not any more than any other liberal novelist; but he does occasionally lampoon them. I’d say he views religion as part of the Establishment, which he, as a good lib, opposes.
I’ve loved lots of his stuff, but he’s losing his touch, in my opinion. The last few books were retreads, snoozers.

kishke on November 19, 2007 at 12:00 pm

“he stated that organized religion gives him the creeps.”
Being a typical Lefty Boomer that he is, the “organized religion” that creeps him out, is only the Western religions, of course( Christian,Catholic,Baptist,Seventh Day,Mormon,etc ),but never makes even a peep about Islam.And if he ever did, he would ,undoubtedly,throw in the old “The devil made them do it” excuse.

OldSchoolW on November 19, 2007 at 1:47 pm

I watched “Misery” the other night, one of King’s best movies, and though I don’t remember it from past viewings I was struck that from the very beginning of the film the villain was wearing a crucifix. It was so ìin your faceî. In light of this discussion I have to wonder if it is not so much Stephen King, he did write ìThe Standî after all, or is it Hollywood. That would not surprise me at all.

Esbiem on November 19, 2007 at 2:03 pm

“Being a typical Lefty Boomer that he is, the “organized religion” that creeps him out, is only the Western religions, of course( Christian,Catholic,Baptist,Seventh Day,Mormon,etc ),but never makes even a peep about Islam.”
Of course he actually said no such thing. He said organized religion creeps him out. He didn’t specify any exceptions. When are you Christianists going to get a grip and stop inventing things to hate??
I’m suspect that, like me, the concept of organized religion creeps him out for the rather obvious reason that there is no such thing as God. That fundamentalists, (Christian, Islamic, Jewish whatever) want to organize entire nations on the precepts of an infantile fairy-tale should ‘creep-out’ any sane person I would have thought.

No Pasaran! on November 20, 2007 at 5:52 am

November 16, 2007
Does Stephen King Hate Christians?
Printer Friendly
By Debbie Schlussel
I’m not sure what Stephen King thinks of Christians. Maybe those of you who read a lot of his work can tell me. But if “The Mist”–a movie out Wednesday for the big Thanksgiving Weekend–is true to his novella, “Skeleton Crew,” on which it’s based, then he certainly doesn’t care too much for them.
I can’t post a complete review here until late Tuesday Night, but the fact is that, in “The Mist,” the biggest villain besides a mysterious mist produced by (who else?) the military (guess King doesn’t like our troops so much either) is a Christian woman, who wears her religion on her sleeve. Played by Marcia Gay Harden, the Christian woman resembles the Fred Phelps folks from the Westboro Baptist Church who protest at troops’ funerals and shriek our troops deserve to die because of our sins. This woman echoes them and blames the plaugue of the mist (and the monsters it spawns) on our sins. Among them, she cites abortion and stem cell research. And she causes the murder–the “sacrifice”–of innocent soldiers. Just like the Phelps team.
themist.jpg
Um, here’s a newsflash: Conservatives and religious Christians detest the Phelps crew of protestors. We don’t agree with them. And we’re not like them, no matter what Stephen King thinks.
Yup, the evil conservative Christian preaching against abortion and stem cells and sexual promiscuity is America’s greatest villain, in the eyes of this movie.
Sad that King can’t find a more believable enemy than that. Looks like the mind of King has gone feeble.
Posted by Debbie at November 16, 2007 03:04 PM
Comments
Debbie, I don’t know if Stephen hates Christians but if he does it’s not a recent thing. I read this story over twenty-five years ago in an anthology and it’s unchanged and unedited. My guess is he doesn’t. If you’ve ever read “The Stand” his basic theme in the novel is one of good vs evil and the main hero of the story is an old woman named “Mother Abigail” who is a devout Christian.
Posted by: Rich B [TypeKey Profile Page] at November 16, 2007 03:32 PM
Since most of King’s stories are based in Maine, it’s going to be hard for him to find a reason to insert a Nazihomoislamofacist into the narrative, Debbie.
But quick, hop into the wayback machine, and go back to 1979 and have him try!
And convince him to change the part about the military weapons test causing the mist to having a Democratically-led Congress passing pro-Mist legislation.
Posted by: The Klute [TypeKey Profile Page] at November 16, 2007 03:46 PM
It is an old short story of his.
*** SPOILERS FROM STORY ***
The army guys commit suicide because they know what the mist brings. The lady spouting off was fairly minor in the book. She didn’t do much more than talk before the main characters decided it was time to get out of there. King only hinted that people were going to start looking for scapegoats. If I remember correctly, the male lead had a sexual encounter with the lead female although he was married. The next day they try to get to his wife but can’t. It sounds like typical Hollywood changes.
Posted by: Terrahawk [TypeKey Profile Page] at November 16, 2007 04:28 PM
Actually, it was more than a short story. It was a novella. Not quite long enough to publish on its own. The woman in the story was one, if not the main antagonist. She did demand a sacrafice of the male charactors son and she was a fundalmentalist nut. In the end of the story, before the main charactor and his son make their break, the woman gets attacked and killed (my memory is hazy on that one). Her name was Mrs Carmody if I remember right. Someone correct me if I’m wrong. From the trailers I’ve seen they have tried (somewhat) to remain true to the novella. I last read this over twenty years ago so I may be off.
Posted by: Rich B [TypeKey Profile Page] at November 16, 2007 05:22 PM
I don’t know if he is anti-christian, but don’t think he is exactly pro-christian either. I too, have read a lot of King’s stuff. But it kept getting stranger as time passed by. I don’t mean strange in a good way either. In fact, it became downright lame.
Posted by: Rocky [TypeKey Profile Page] at November 16, 2007 05:41 PM
Those Fred Phelps people are VERY SCARY!
Posted by: LoveAManInAUniform [TypeKey Profile Page] at November 16, 2007 06:19 PM
in his NIGHTLINE interview 11/16 he was asked his opinion of religion.
he stated that organized religion “gives him the creeps.”
Posted by: louielouie [TypeKey Profile Page] at November 17, 2007 01:09 PM
If King wants to rant about religious fanaticism, he should first look at Saudi Arabia and elsewhere in the middle-east and see how rape victims and homosexuals are handled but he won’t look because he is blinded with contempt and disdain towards Christians. What makes him think he is more tolerant than them anyways?King is too busy attacking ministers for condemning same sex marriage and rampant sexual decedency but has no words to reprimand Achmadinejad for hanging gays on a crane in public or stoning women to death who were alleged of illicit promiscuous behaviour/rape.
Admittedly,I only read one of his novels. Maybe I’ll do a political assesment on each novelist before reading his/her book from here on.
Posted by: Jew Chick [TypeKey Profile Page] at November 18, 2007 07:47 PM
Jew Chick,
The story “The Mist” was published back in 1980, which means it was probably written in 1979 or earlier, which predates Ahmadinejad by, what, 22 years? But you’re right, he should have hopped into the TARDIS and saw Iran would be like before he wrote this horror story set in Maine.
“Admittedly,I only read one of his novels.”
Which obviously qualifies you to… oh wait, it doesn’t.
Posted by: The Klute [TypeKey Profile Page] at November 18, 2007 08:22 PM
I didn’t read the novella, but I saw “The Mist” at a free preview screening in NYC two Friday’s ago. Needless to say, I thought the anti-military, anti-religious screeds in the movie were waaaaay over the top. The ending was also telegraphed when the father, son, woman, older woman, and older man, escaped to the home of the ‘hero’, searching for his wife. Plus, Andre Braugher’s character (an actor I enjoy) was absolutely silly, even for a lawyer. What lawyer wouldn’t want to see proof, except for maybe an ACLU one? Glad I didn’t pay for this dreck, even as a rental.
Posted by: Rick [TypeKey Profile Page] at November 19, 2007 11:59 AM
I’ve read almost everything King has written (except the Mist and one or two others). He’s not particularly anti-Christian; not any more than any other liberal novelist; but he does occasionally lampoon them. I’d say he views religion as part of the Establishment, which he, as a good lib, opposes.
I’ve loved lots of his stuff, but he’s losing his touch, in my opinion. The last few books were retreads, snoozers.
Posted by: kishke [TypeKey Profile Page] at November 19, 2007 12:00 PM
“he stated that organized religion gives him the creeps.”
Being a typical Lefty Boomer that he is, the “organized religion” that creeps him out, is only the Western religions, of course( Christian,Catholic,Baptist,Seventh Day,Mormon,etc ),but never makes even a peep about Islam.And if he ever did, he would ,undoubtedly,throw in the old “The devil made them do it” excuse.
Posted by: OldSchoolW [TypeKey Profile Page] at November 19, 2007 01:47 PM
I watched “Misery” the other night, one of King’s best movies, and though I don’t remember it from past viewings I was struck that from the very beginning of the film the villain was wearing a crucifix. It was so ìin your faceî. In light of this discussion I have to wonder if it is not so much Stephen King, he did write ìThe Standî after all, or is it Hollywood. That would not surprise me at all.
Posted by: Esbiem [TypeKey Profile Page] at November 19, 2007 02:03 PM
“Being a typical Lefty Boomer that he is, the “organized religion” that creeps him out, is only the Western religions, of course( Christian,Catholic,Baptist,Seventh Day,Mormon,etc ),but never makes even a peep about Islam.”
“Of course he actually said no such thing. He said organized religion creeps him out. He didn’t specify any exceptions. When are you Christianists going to get a grip and stop inventing things to hate??”
It’s Old Leftist Doubletalk. In all the years I have experienced Leftists like him spouting off on religions,they have you assuming they mean all religions,but when they get specific,they never attack Islam. Believe me, they mean ONLY Western religions.And they will never attack Islam, just as they never attack any enemies of the West,as they haven’t for the last few decades.

OldSchoolW on November 20, 2007 at 2:54 pm

“It’s Old Leftist Doubletalk. In all the years I have experienced Leftists like him spouting off on religions,they have you assuming they mean all religions,but when they get specific,they never attack Islam.”
Old rightist lies and doubletalk.
Have you never heard the likes of Christopher Hitchens or George Monbiot criticizing Islam? I have, as would anyone who cared to listen.
The likes of you don’t listen of course, because you can’t cope with anything that doesn’t mesh with your prejudices and hatred of your fellow man.
that’s why conservatism is the greatest force for evil in the world today. it teaches people to hate, and to refuse to listen.

No Pasaran! on November 21, 2007 at 6:54 am

I read the story as a kid. I think I will have to revisit it. The Mist emanated from The Shop; the mystery CIA-like shady government/military organization. I think it represents the fact that we don’t know alot of what goes on in government, and is a recurring theme in many of his books. In fact their are plenty of dirty little secrets, known and unknown. So I can’t fault King for being critical of a government.
In fact, he can be critical of christian fundamenalists too. I don’t care. If we think he is referring to all Christians, that’s our baggage. And I don’t think it will change any minds about Christians. Minds are already made up.
Also, for King fans, his stories (in my opinion) rarely translate directly to screen. King hated Kubrick’s The Shining, but it was truly more terrifying than King’s version. And I must say that the book was the only one of his that truly terrified me to the core (I was too chicken to read it until I was in my twenties).
I read King books over and over until falling apart. But after a certain point it did seem played out. I did finish all of the Dark Tower books, however. And thought the ending took some stones on his part.
He is a typical aging Boomer dealing with the reality that his generation will come and go. It’s impact viewed as terrible, and as a footnote. I would feel pity if so many Boomers weren’t such selfish jerks. Oops, that’s MY baggage seeping in!

Your Jewish Master on November 21, 2007 at 3:24 pm

Debbie; Stephen King has an absolute anti Chritian message in nearly all of his films. This latest character has been downplayed as minor, but in fact its one of the main items in advertising for the film. The role is much larger than the single line in the film “Passion of the Christ” which was much maligned by jewish groups for stated that “his blood is on us” referring to the death of Christ by jews. A few of Many examples of Kings anti-christian messages in film: Carrie – with a nut case christian religous jealot mother who tortures and murders her daugher; The Lawnmower Man with a pedophile-like sadistic priest; Silver Bullet – the murderer is a christian pastor who justifies killing as doing good, and there is a scene in his church where the congregation is turning to monster; (have you ever seen a film with members of a synagog changing to monster or a Rabbi being a murderer??);Salems Lot – Father Callahan is dubious at best.
What we see in King is a need to portray any traditional values as suspect and negative, and those who run counter to those values as the heroes. Maybe it’s some defect in his own life which led him to this. But you are correct, there is a bias in Kings works against Christians, never against jews or any non-traditional behavours.

johnbuck on November 25, 2007 at 10:19 am

Stephen King does NOT hate Christians. And why is everyone here trying to bash Islam? Islam is not inherintly evil. Radical Islam is, and I’m going to follow that up with so is Radical Christianity. You people (you know who you are) are hate mongers and you are just as bad as the Islamic extremeists who hate Christians. Jesus Christ preached to love your neighbor as yourself, not to hate anyone who is different or doesn’t agree with you. I am both Christian and Republican, and I’m sorry to say that people like you make me almost ashamed of both of those. You’re giving those of us out here who are truly living the gospel a bad name. Those are the Christians Stephen King speaks badly of in his novels. I’m also about to make you hate me with my next statement, but I’m also a Catholic (yes, you ignorant people Catholics are Christians too. In fact, we were the first) and Stephen King very rarely writes badly of us. Because we are tolerant, loving and live the gospel and you don’t.

Avitt27 on March 24, 2008 at 10:31 am

    We all fall short in doing what is right before God, there is no perfect person. With all the knowledge and the gifts we are given it would be amazing if they could be used to uplift and glorify one another.
    I was badly scalded as a young girl which lead me to seek after something that would have me seek horror and such blood shocking events as to see that worse things can happen to others. Since then I did not find this to give me any strenght or make me feel better about life. As a result I no longer am drawn to this kind of writing or movies.
    Love God above all man and his judges. And love others even if they had you. Forgive them they know not what they do.

    Angel on October 9, 2012 at 6:55 pm

It sad that you felt this movie was a direct ploy at demeaning christians, i think the most important line in this film was the one in which the unorthodox biker states “i believe in god, just not one that asks us to pay for our sins with blood and gore” …i think the point this movie serves is to show the hipocracy within us all…christian or not and how easily it is for any one to become a false prophet in harsh times….. i think this movie shows a deep love and respect for god and embodies how difficult it is for us all to make decisions…. In the bible god gave his only son in order to make things better…this man was faced with the same crisis… instead of feeling attacked sometimes its better to look at the puzzle from all sides and see that there is more than on message in everything….which is what this movie showed…. how everyone can mean well but become steared in diffrent directions in hopes of achieving the ultimate gift of “life” basically

arielhh on April 1, 2008 at 10:19 pm

First off: Even if it was true that King is anti-Christian, what’s the big deal? He’s a writer, not a politican, and he deserves his own views.
Truthfully, though, he’s probably not, but can we know for sure? I read a lot of his novels, many of which condemn homophobia, racism, and Christian zealots. Why is this a bad thing? Religious zealots of any kind ARE bad, and the fact that King writes about Christian ones probably pertains to his own experiences or preference. He shouldn’t HAVE to “write about Islamic zealots too, otherwise he’s being unfair and hurting our feelings!!1″ He will write about whatever he wants. Nobody is forcing to you to read it.
And since you’re talking about movies, keep in mind that sometimes he doesn’t write the screenplay for it. That’s a lot of additions Hollywood directors make.

KAT on August 16, 2009 at 6:09 pm

I’ve re-visited Stephen King lately, because “Cell” really shocked me at his undisguised hatred of Bush and the Right. Typical of any rich lib, of course, and so par for the course that I just rolled my eyes and shook my head at the fairy-tale worlds such lefists live in. But as a good artist, I was shocked that he’s slipped so much that his own hatreds and discriminations would bleed through like that. So I went back and began reading some of his old stuff, and sure enough, if it wasn’t bashing Nixon (but never a naughty word about LBJ) or his reliance on anyone religious as being a freak (from Carrie’s mother to Johnny’s mother in “The Dead Zone” to the before-mentioned crazy woman in “The Mist), he’s always harbored a hatred for established religions. Not all of them. As a good brainwashed liberal he would never DARE say anything bad about Islam. (Too scared after the death threats on Rushdie, perhaps), but no holds barred against organized religion.

I wish the man would retire, but I don’t think that’s possible.

Sazz on November 12, 2009 at 11:24 pm

I don’t think that stephen king is anti-christian in the least. If organized religion gives him the creeps then so what? The zealots alongside people who are anti-religious zealots are what is very wrong with the overall picture. I happen to believe in god and in the teachings of jesus christ. But I’m not about to tell someone else how they’re wrong to have a different view. Hate from any side was never part of the plan. And I don’t recall mrs. Carmody ever mentioning jesus christ. To me her rantings were more like those of an islamic zealot with a crush the infidel type attitude. And those christians that go against christ’s teachings by giving in to hatred? You’ve got an unpleasant surprise coming.

justin on December 9, 2009 at 1:49 pm

I know what you mean. I am not sure how King feels about Christians in general but I get the feeling of overall disdain from him with regard to organized religion and any zealots. In The Stand, however, he does have Mother Abigail rely on her talks with God and the story is about good vs. evil.
And I agree with you about Phelps. In my opinion, that man is not a Christian and I wish he would stop using the Bible as an excuse for his hateful activities. Phelps is a publicity whore and extremely unbalanced. It’s a shame he causes some uninformed people to believe all Christians share his views. In fact, I know no one that shares his views.

Gina Magini on May 8, 2010 at 12:08 am

Stephen King seems to make a lot of Christian people the villain in his stories…

I can think of two more including Shawshank Redemption and others

Rellee on September 28, 2011 at 3:11 pm

Fuck this article, and fuck you too.

Luke Bryan on April 30, 2012 at 10:03 pm

I do not think he hates Christians at all. His religious characters which are portrayed in a negative manner are not true representations of faith. They are full of judgement and bible spouting as in the mother from Carrie or the woman from the Mist. These are bad people who claim religion. Moreover, King sends a powerful message of good. When one stays in Faith and rightfully takes The Stand, they win. When one goes against Faith as in Salem’s Lot and Storm of the Century–they lose. His stories become similar to parables. I see nothing wrong with portraying religious people as negative if there actions are as such.

AJ on July 9, 2012 at 8:20 pm

I have to say I find your conclusion to be based on a branch of reasoning that doesn’t strike me as necessarily true. If Mr. King has a villainous Christian character, why does that mean he dislikes Christians? Are you saying if you’re a writer you have to believe the same way as your story. For instance just because you write a story where the hero is vegetarian and the villain eats meat, doesn’t mean you have to be a vegetarian yourself. You could write a story where the hero is against capital punishment, and in real life be in favour of capital punishment yourself. You could write a story where the hero is an atheist and in real life be a Christian yourself. Why would anyone think it’s necessary for a writer to have to agree with their characters? I can’t see any reason for that.
And if your villain is French, or albino, or a Sagittarius, or a man, does what mean the writer has to believe that French people or albinos or people with the star sign Sagittarius or men are villainous? Why does something an artist creates HAVE to reflect their own views. Can’t they just write stuff?
Plus your line saying -“Um, here’s a newsflash: Conservatives and religious Christians detest the Phelps crew of protestors. We don’t agree with them.” Well no one in the movie said they did. No one. Maybe some people took that interpretation but that’s their business. Neither the book nor the novel said that.

Plus, ignoring the fact that having someone from any group that exists in real life I.e. Christians, atheists, vegans, smokers, diabetics etc. being cast as a villain doesn’t mean the writer has to hate them in real life, you can cast anyone want as the villain and have no feelings good, bad or indifferent to them yourself. I get that some writers do, and aren’t too subtle about it, but I don’t see why it HAS to be the case. Like it’s a rule all Humans have to obey like gravity or death, whether we like it or not.
Plus even if it was the case (writing a member of a group, in this case Christians, as a villain= you don’t like that group in real-life), wouldn’t that point be invalidated if you write in a good member of that group? You seem to be forgetting there was a heroic Christian character in the film. That big, tough looking biker guy, specifically says he believes in God and rejects Carmody’s stereotypical view of him as a sadistic tyrant who must be obeyed, his exact words are “Hey crazy lady, I believe in God too. I just don‘t believe he‘s the bloodthirsty asshole you make him out to be!” Plus the character is shown to brave, risking his life to get help and his death is sympathetic.
And that’s just The Mist. In The Green Mile lots of the heroic and likeable characters are shown to be Christian, one referring to miracles in general as “praise Jesus miracles” and the healing powered John Coffee clearly believes in God too. And all of them are likeable good guys.
So if writing a character who’s a villain and a Christian means in real life you hate Christians, doesn’t writing a hero who’s Christian mean you love Christians? How can it be both? Or maybe, just maybe, you don’t have to like or dislike real life groups to have as hero’s /villains be one in your stories.

dock on January 12, 2013 at 10:50 am

I am the biggest Stephen King fan you’ll ever meet so I know a lot about this topic. Stephen King is quoted as saying that religion is the root of all evil. He despises religion because of the negative that it can cause. However, Stephen is himself a Christian. He owns and often reads the Bible. The Stand is actually an allegory speaking on faith in a God. He does have a liberal view and since his daughter is a lesbian, of course he is against people who judge her. Those things are what he hates about religion. But he has no hatred for Christians or for God. Just religious nut jobs who take things too far.

Rachel D on March 23, 2013 at 10:19 pm

“Sad that King can’t find a more believable enemy than that. Looks like the mind of King has gone feeble.”

Hmm actually, it looks like millions of people’s mind are the ones that are feeble.. since religion is mankind’s greatest enemy and evil. There is your truth.

Wendy S. on October 5, 2013 at 5:27 pm

Anyone who blames all the worlds troubles on religion are politically manipulated and naive lemmings who don’t understand that human nature will twist and abuse anything it can. Those who abuse it are disobeying the teachings of Christ so it truly takes someone ignorant to blame it for those who disobey it. And since we’re villifying things because of man’s greed and lust, lets go ahead and blame atheism for stalins massacre of millions in the name of a godless utopia. Nah, that would be as stupid as blaming all the worlds evil on religion.

B on October 18, 2013 at 7:09 pm

I have read Stephen King novels since Carrie and was an avid fan for years, buying his books as soon as they came out. It wasn’t until I was older and had read many of his books that I noticed the pattern in his writing of his disdain and hatred for Christianity. It’s really quite obvious and predictable now. I stopped reading his books after picking up one several years ago (can’t remember the title) and in the first few pages he described a random Christian character passing by on a bridge as having “crazy eyes” and spouting nonsense. As a Christian, I don’t want to pay someone for continuously portraying Christians as the “root of all evil.” I did get his Dark Tower series from the library, which I love, maybe because it doesn’t have that sneering, anti-Christian posture. Anyone who says he isn’t anti-Christian hasn’t read his books.

My family watched Misery last night as a Halloween movie and we also were struck by the fact that the villain wears a cross in every scene. I was wondering if King had suggested that or if it were a Rob Reiner contribution.

AB on October 27, 2013 at 8:50 am

When you have read all of his works, as I have, you start to notice how he writes what he knows. He see’s crazy church people and writes about them. I think he believes in God, but tries to avoid getting to close to religion. By the way the mist, as he hinted to in his dark tower magnum opus is from another dimension
where weird creatures exist, and the government shooting atoms into the air opened it. -And by the way Debbie Schlussel you should read the book, not the movie…Think if you watched the tom cruise war of the worlds, and not read HG well’s book how much your opinion would change(i assume you think Hg Wells is brilliant.

Grant on November 3, 2013 at 11:39 pm

i enjoyed the movie. i’ve watched it several times. that woman is a character and a successful one at that, she is absolutely dreadful! But since everyone’s throwing their opinions here and there are so many christians involved in this post I would like to add that religion IS a joke. promoting peace yet always segregating… THERE WILL NEVER BE PEACE WHERE RELIGION IS INVOLVED
and you’re all ruining a perfectly good villain with your own judgements AND guilt in being a shite human beings and “servants of the Lord” your God. cast your stones you talentless fucks

christina on January 8, 2014 at 8:54 pm

After reading the comments, from beginning to end, the most logical response was written by Dock, Jan 12, 2013.

Those of you bashing Steven King, drawing conclusions via his novels, in all probability, never considered writing Fiction.
If you had, all characters would have similar personalities, views, clothing, speech patters, etc.

In my opinion, Steven King believes in God…whether he goes to ‘X’ church or not.
He’s anti-’fanatical’ fundamentalists. Who isn’t?
He and his family read The Bible regularly. I don’t know which version, but the point is, they as a family were spiritual.

BTW, I listed my favorite comment, which was Dock. My least favorite was written on Jan 8, 2014.

Debbie, perhaps you should read King’s books, not movies, before judging.

Toni on August 5, 2014 at 12:15 pm

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